Wednesday Vignette: Dreaming Trees

Ficus afghanistanica 'Silver Lyre' 2014

Ficus afghanistanica ‘Silver Lyre’ planted 2014

~

“Even if I knew that tomorrow the world

would go to pieces,

I would still plant my apple tree.”

.

Martin Luther

~

Star Magnolia 2015

Star Magnolia planted 2015

~

“My own heroes are the dreamers,

those men and women who tried to make the world

a better place than when they found it,

whether in small ways or great ones.

Some succeeded, some failed,

most had mixed results…

but it is the effort that’s heroic, as I see it.

Win or lose,

I admire those who fight the good fight.”

.

George R.R. Martin

~

Crepe Myrtel 2015

Crepe Myrtle planted 2015

~

“Most of the important things in the world

have been accomplished

by people who have kept on trying

when there seemed to be no hope at all.”

.

Dale Carnegie

~

september-21-2016-rain-013

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

Do you plant trees?  Planting a tree, whether for yourself or someone else, is one of the most powerful gestures one can make to assure a happy and healthy future.  Here are just a few of the trees we’ve planted over the last five years.

~

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

~

The Arbor  Day Foundation sponsors several worthwhile programs to ensure that more community trees are planted each year.  The one which has my interest right now is “Neighborwoods Month.” October is a great time of year for planting trees in our region.   

Perhaps you will consider planting a tree or two of your own between now and the end of October. 

Here is the child’s tree dedication prayer recited in Philadelphia at the planting of a new community tree: 

” We dedicate this tree to beauty, usefulness, and comfort. 

May our lives grow in beauty, usefulness, and comfort to others

even as these trees expand their leafy boughs. 

Let us strive to protect and care for them

and they may so be enjoyed by all people…”

~

september-21-2016-trees-009

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday Vignettes: Transformation

september-5-2016-parkway-011

~

“Sorrow prepares you for joy.

It violently sweeps everything out of your house,

so that new joy can find space to enter.

It shakes the yellow leaves

from the bough of your heart,

so that fresh, green leaves can grow in their place.

It pulls up the rotten roots,

so that new roots hidden beneath have room to grow.

Whatever sorrow shakes from your heart,

far better things will take their place.”

.

Jalaluddin Rumi

~

september-5-2016-parkway-015

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

september-5-2016-parkway-006

~
“When you become the image of your own imagination,
it’s the most powerful thing you could ever do.”
.
RuPaul

Wednesday Vignette: Rudbeckia

August 17, 2016 garden 038

~

“From a bud of the evening

a flower opens its petal in the dawn.

The world sees the bud of the last night

smiling with nectar on its lips.

No one observed the diligence

that was needed

for the opening of each petal.”

.

Pratibha Ray

~

August 17, 2016 garden 039

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

August 17, 2016 garden 043

~

“Amateurs look for inspiration;

the rest of us just get up and go to work.”

.

Chuck Close

Wednesday Vignette

July 31, 2016 flowers 015
~

“Don’t you ever let a soul in the world

tell you that you can’t be exactly who you are.”

.

Lady Gaga

~
July 31, 2016 flowers 019
~

“Some of us get dipped in flat, some in satin, some in gloss….”

He turned to me. “But every once in a while,

you find someone who’s iridescent,

and when you do, nothing will ever compare.”


.

Wendelin Van Draanen

~

August 2, 2016 Crepe Myrtle 010
~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

August 1, 2016 blossoms 013

~

“I was not designed to be forced.

I will breathe after my own fashion.

Let us see who is the strongest.”

.

Henry David Thoreau

~

July 31, 2016 flowers 007

.

CC banner-1

Wildlife Wednesday

July 27, 2016 morning garden 016

~

The beauty and mystery of this world

only emerges through affection, attention,

interest and compassion . . .

open your eyes wide and actually see this world

by attending to its colors, details and irony.”

.

Orhan Pamuk

~

July 27, 2016 morning garden 017

~

“Once again, we are reminded that awakening,

or enlightenment is not the property of Buddhism,

any more than Truth is the property of Christianity.

Neither the Buddha nor the Christ

belongs exclusively to the communities

that were founded in their names.

They belong to all people of goodwill,

all who are attentive to the secret

which lives in the depths

of their breath and their consciousness.”

.

Jean-Yves Leloup

~

July 27, 2016 morning garden 010

~

“The best way to capture moments is to pay attention.

This is how we cultivate mindfulness.

Mindfulness means being awake.

It means knowing what you are doing.”

.

Jon Kabat-Zinn

~

July 27, 2016 morning garden 066

~

“Miracles… seem to me to rest not so much

upon… healing power coming suddenly

near us from afar but upon our perceptions

being made finer, so that, for a moment,

our eyes can see and our ears can hear

what is there around us always.”

.

Willa Cather

~

July 26, 2016 leaves 049

~

Appreciation to Tina, at My Gardener Says, for hosting Wildlife Wednesday the first Wednesday of each month.  She has hosted this meme for a little more than two years now, encouraging all of us to notice the wildlife sharing our gardens.

Tina writes:  ” Especially in urban areas, planting for birds, pollinators, and other wild animals helps balance ongoing damage to natural zones and allows our world to heal–if just a little bit–by providing for those who can’t speak for themselves and with whom we share our world.”

~
July 27, 2016 morning garden 057
~
Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

July 27, 2016 morning garden 056

 

 

Wednesday Vignette

July 20, 2016 sky 003

~

“Peace is present right here and now,

in ourselves and in everything we do and see.

Every breath we take, every step we take,

can be filled with peace, joy, and serenity.

The question is whether or not we are in touch with it.

We need only to be awake, alive in the present moment.”


.

Thich Nhat Hanh

~

July 18, 2016 mugs 017~

“Accept the seasons of your heart,

even as you have always accepted the seasons

that pass over your fields.

And you would watch with serenity

through the winters of your grief.”

.

Kahlil Gibran

~

July 20, 2016 sky 004

~
Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016
~

July 20, 2016 sky 005

Wildlife Wednesday

July 13, 2016 garden close ups 032

~

“Mindfulness is not the path of chasing.

It is the path of beautification.

When flowers blossom, the fragrance spreads,

and the bees come.”

.

Amit Ray

~

July 13, 2016 garden close ups 030

~

“We need to return to harmony with Nature

and with each other,

to become what humans were destined to be,

builders of gardens and Shires,

hobbits (if you will),

not Masters over creatures great and small.”

.

Steve Bivans

~

July 13, 2016 garden close ups 024

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

July 13, 2016 garden close ups 027

~

“Gardens are not made by singing ‘Oh, how beautiful!’

and sitting in the shade.”

.

Rudyard Kipling

~

July 13, 2016 garden close ups 004

~

 

“It is not reasonable that art should win

the place of honor over our great and powerful

mother Nature. We have so overloaded

the beauty and richness of her works

by our inventions that we have quite smothered her.”

.

Michel de Montaigne

~

July 13, 2016 garden close ups 002

Wordless Wednesday: Hydrangea

June 7, 2016 Garden Tour 005

~

“Green was the silence, wet was the light,
the month of June trembled like a butterfly.”
.

Pablo Neruda

~

June 7, 2016 Garden Tour 014

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

June 7, 2016 Garden Tour 022

 

Wordless Wednesday: Acer

May 13, 2016 Begonias 029

~

“Peace is not the absence of chaos.

It is the presence of tranquility and joy

in the midst of chaos.”

.

Debasish Mridha

~

Connie Hansen Conservancy, Lincoln City, OR

Connie Hansen Conservancy, Lincoln City, OR

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

May 28, 2016 ferns 005

Our Latest Experiment: Milorganite

Connie Hansen Garden, Lincoln City Oregon

The Connie Hansen Garden, in Lincoln City, Oregon, where deer roam freely through the beach front community.  This beautiful garden remains open to the public – and the deer- year round.

~

A friend and neighbor, allies in our battle against hungry deer, first mentioned Milorganite several years back.  I’d never heard of the stuff.  She said she was trying it as a deer deterrent with some success.

She and her partner garden on one of the most exposed water front lots in our part of the community.  We collaborated together on our list of deer resistant plants, but I never followed up on her suggestion to try Milorganite.  Now I wish we had…..milorganite

A year or so later, a Gloucester based landscaper suggested it to me again.  He recommended creating a barrier around one’s entire garden by broadcasting a 3′-4′ wide strip of the smelly stuff around the perimeter of any area you need to protect.  He swore deer wouldn’t cross it.  Sounded like a good idea; which I filed away to explore in more detail later.

Meanwhile, our personal battle to protect our garden from the deer continues.  It’s not just the plants we want to protect from their grazing.  Deer carry ticks, and ticks carry Lyme’s disease and other nasty infections.  We’ve both had several bites over the years followed by expensive visits to the doctor, tests, and prescriptions.

Lyme’s disease is one of those infections one never truly gets over; it can linger in the body and flare up later in unexpected ways.  It changes people’s lives in unpleasant ways; another reason to stay away from deer and ticks.  We figured this out, of course, only after we fell in love with the community  and bought our little forest garden.  We’ve learned a great deal since then.

~

August 27, 2014 Parkway 021

~

After nearly seven years of finding ways to foil the deer, a few somehow still slip into the garden from time to time.  And once in, they find tasties to nibble while spreading ticks and leaving their little ‘gifts.’   We’ve both had ticks latch onto us this spring, already.

~

By mid-August of 2014 surrounding shrubs shade the actual raised bed..

By mid-August, our garden grows in with plenty of temptations for grazing deer.

~

But a casual conversation with one of the garden experts at Lowes, earlier this week, reminded me of Milorganite.  She gardens on the Northern Neck, along the Piankatank River slightly north of Williamsburg.  And she contends with herds of deer, too.  She highly recommended Milorganite as a deer repellent in the garden.

~

August 7, 2014 garden 040

~

Now, before we go any further in this story, I need to share with you our real reason for avoiding Milorganite all these years.  I was all set to try it years ago until we learned its true nature:  municipal sewage sludge.  Somehow we just didn’t want to spread dried sewage all around our garden, despite its potential benefits.

Since 1926, the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has processed the sludge from its sewage treatment plant to produce a 5-2-0 natural fertilizer known as Milorganite. Milwaukee Organic Nitrogen” was devised to reduce material in landfills while recycling this natural source of nitrogen as a safe fertilizer for lawns, golf courses, and agriculture.  The dried sewage is heat dried to kill bacteria and other pathogens, then pelletized to produce an easy to apply, dust free organic fertilizer.  But all the processing doesn’t completely remove the odor, which is why Milorganite repels deer.

~

Rose scented Geranium

Rose scented geranium has proven a more pleasant deer repellent than sprays.  We plant scented Pelargoniums all around the garden to protect tasty shrubs and perennials.  They also repel mosquitoes, ticks, and other insects.

~

If you’ve bought a spray bottle of deer repellent lately, you know it’s very pricey.  Whether you buy Plantskydd , Repells- All, or some other product; you make an investment which often washes away in the next thunderstorm.

After resisting Milorganite these last few years, we finally decided to try it earlier this week.  The little guys have been slipping through our ‘deer fences’ and have already grazed some favorite roses and Camellias just as they leafed out this spring.  We are weary of chasing them out of the garden with no clue as to how they get in or out….

A 36 pound bag of Milorganite, enough to treat 2500 square feet, was only around $13.00 at Lowes.  On Monday afternoon we decided to give it a try, and bought a bag. Produced as a ‘slow release’ fertilizer, it lasts a long time before it completely dissolves into the soil.  How long will it work for us?  That is part of our experiment….

~

April 5, 2016 070

~

I suited up in my usual garden ‘get up,’ covered head to toe, with hat and gloves; and broadcast the first strip of Milorganite along our street.  Using a recycled plastic quart food container, I shook a light application in the spaces between our shrubs, and especially around the Camellias, from the pavement back to our deer fence behind the shrubs.

It wasn’t bad, really.  It didn’t smell as bad as the sprays we use, and was so much easier to apply.  Our single bag proved sufficient to broadcast a 4′ perimeter around our entire garden, and also to make barriers around vulnerable beds of Azaleas, roses, Hydrangeas, and perennials.  I laid a stripe everywhere we know the deer frequent in our garden.

~

Azaleas once filed our front garden. In recent years, a growing herd of deer graze on what little remains.

Azaleas once filed our front garden. In recent years, a growing herd of deer graze on what little remains.

~

Although the University of Georgia has published studies on Milorganite as a deer repellent, it isn’t marketed as one.  Its use to repel animals is a ‘word of mouth’ sort of thing between gardeners.  And how long a single application will last depends on any number of variables.  We plan to spread it again by the middle of June, then again in September.  Based on what we’ve read, it should last close to 90 days during the growing season.

Now we watch and wait.  My daydreams of full, lush Azalea shrubs and un-grazed roses may finally come true.  Our hopes to finally watch our Hostas mature, un-nibbled and full, may be realized this year.  Faith, hope and love wax strongest in a gardener’s heart in early spring, before realities set in.

~

June 21 Lanai 022~

I’ll let you know how it works, of course.  If Milorganite performs as well as other gardeners have promised, we might actually plant a few vegetables later in the season with hope to harvest a cucumber or two!  I’m curious to learn whether it deters squirrels, rabbits, voles, and other mammals, in addition to deer.  If it does, we will use it faithfully from now on.

~

May 15, 2015 roses 010~

We may be holding our noses, metaphorically speaking, but we’ll gladly support the city of Milwaukee in their recycling efforts.  And we’ll spread the word as broadly as we spread the Milorganite!

Have you tried Milorganite in your garden?  If you have, how well does  it work for you?

~

It was almost 9 PM when I took these photos of our rabbit on Wednesday evening. A long day, indeed.

~

Woodland Gnome 2016

In recognition of Wildlife Wednesday

(Tina has posted some lovely photos of birds visiting her garden this month. 

Please visit her for links to other Wildlife Wednesday posts this April.)

 

~

April 5, 2016 051

A mother Cardinal built her nest by our kitchen door. We feel honored by her trust.

 

Our Forest Garden- The Journey Continues

Please visit and follow Our Forest Garden- The Journey Continues to see all new posts since January 8, 2021.

A new site allows me to continue posting new content since after more than 1700 posts there is no more room on this site.  -WG

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 777 other followers

Follow Forest Garden on WordPress.com

Topics of Interest