Sunday Dinner: The Beauty of Tenacity

Siletz Bay, Oregon

~

“Most of the things worth doing in the world
had been declared impossible
before they were done.”

.

Louis D. Brandeis

~
~

“There are times in life
when people must know when not to let go.
Balloons are designed to teach small children this.”

.

Terry Pratchett

~
~

“People can be at their most vulnerable,
but still tenacious at the same time.”

.

Toni Bernhard
~

Rhododendron re-blooms in October at the Connie Hansen Garden Conservancy.

~

“The qualities of a successful man
are tenacity, perseverance, courage
and the will to win”

.

Sunday Adelaja

~

Mussels grow amid barnacles on rocks jutting up through a sandy beach on Oregon’s central coast.

~

“Tenacity is the dance

within the art of opportunity”

.
Rasheed Ogunlaru

~

Aging Rhododendrons regenerate with new growth at the Connie Hansen Garden.

~
“NEVER GIVE UP.
No matter what is going on,
Never give up.
Develop the heart.
Too much energy in your country
Is spent developing the mind
Instead of the heart.
Be compassionate,
Not just to your friends,
But to everyone.
Be compassionate,
Work for peace.
In your heart and in the world,
Work for peace.
And I say again,
Never give up,
No matter what is going on around you.
Never give up.”
.
Tenzin Gyatso, Dalai Lama XIV
~
~
Photos by Woodland Gnome 2017
~

Ferns cover the exposed rock work at Cape Foulweather along Highway 101 in the coastal mountains of Oregon.

~

“Beauty is seen in repetition;
keep repeating your beauty
even if your beauty is not all that beautiful,
you shall still leave a mark
and there shall come a moment
when the beauty will be seen”

.

Ernest Agyemang Yeboah

Advertisements

There and Back Again: The (After)Glow

~

“Why do you go away?
So that you can come back.
So that you can see the place you came from
with new eyes and extra colors.
And the people there see you differently, too.
Coming back to where you started
is not the same as never leaving.”
.
Terry Pratchet

~

~

Travel invites us to break our routines, sharpen our senses, and open ourselves to seeing our world from a novel point of view.

Back now from a week on the West Coast with daughter and her family, I am enjoying the warm after-glow of our time together as I edit the hundreds of photos which came home with me.

~

~

The weather was fine during most of my visit, and so we spent as much time as we could playing on the many beautiful nearby beaches, or letting little one run and explore at the Connie Hansen Garden Conservancy.  I was very pleased to see the upgrades and improvements to the garden there, all accomplished by devoted volunteer gardeners.

~

A sunset walk at the Connie Hansen garden revealed this beautiful glade beneath old Rhododendrons.

~

Now nearly four years old, my granddaughter has grown and matured a great deal since I last saw her.  She bubbles with happiness and personality; her fearless energy driving her to explore and transcend the limitations of the very young (and sometimes the very old…)

~

~

I watched as my daughter tended her own garden, and as she tended this beautiful child.  It takes great vision, patience and understanding to nurture both children and gardens.  

We wandered together through a local nursery while little one was away at her pre-school class; I indulged in buying herbs, flowers and ferns to grow in my daughter’s garden and in her care.

~

Beautiful native and exotic ferns fill the shady spots at the Connie Hansen Garden.

~

There was so much to enjoy and to feel glad about on this visit to the Oregon Coast.  I was delighted to find abundant life in the tidal pools and around the rocks which line the coast.

~

~

“Wherever you go becomes a part of you somehow.”
.
Anita Desai

~

~

I have come home energized and inspired.  Even as I unpack, re-organize and readjust to Eastern time; my mind is teeming with ideas to tend and improve my own garden.  I’ve photos to share, trees to sculpt, bulbs to plant and plans to make with friends.

~

I made this for a friend one evening, after little one and her mom went home.  Now I am filled with ideas for incorporating sculpted trees with slices of geode to make unique pendants.

~

There will be a new line of note cards with photos taken in Oregon.  And, I came home with heavy suitcases because I picked up so many beautiful rocks from the beach!

I’ll soon use them as bases for the trees I plan to make over the next few weeks.

~

What an unusual view of Siletz Bay, with the tide completely gone out.  These trees remain an inspiration to me as I combine organic and mineral forms.

~

“The real voyage of discovery
consists not in seeking new landscapes,
but in having new eyes.”
.
Marcel Proust
~

So fair warning:  I have many photos  left from my trip to share here at Forest Garden during the coming weeks.  I hope you won’t mind too much..

I remain intrigued by how the same plant grown in Virginia and grown in Oregon can come to look so different. Climate and soil make all the difference.

And I am endlessly fascinated by the magic that always greets me in Oregon.

~

Gorgeous Fuchsia grows at Mossy Creek Pottery near Gleneden Beach, Oregon.

~
Photos by Woodland Gnome 2017

~

~
Fabulous Friday:  Happiness is contagious….
Let’s infect one another!
~

~

For the Daily Post’s
Weekly Photo Challenge:  Glow

Eclipse

Sunset over  College Creek, at (Gabriel) Archer’s Hope, near Jamestown, Virginia

~

Just as light and darkness maintain their own balance, and follow one another; so too do times of darkness and light follow one another in human history. Opposing forces remain in cyclical tension throughout our planet’s history.

We welcome the darkness which allows us to rest each night, and we awake hours later refreshed and reinvigorated. Our bodies heal and re-energize while we sleep.

Plants also need a period of darkness for their growth and cellular repair after many hours of photosynthesis in the sunlight each day. Many plants need a period of dormancy and rest each year, before vigorous new growth responds to the lengthening days of spring.

~

Winter Solstice morning

~

Northwestern Oregon, where the eclipse over the United States will begin next Monday, symbolizes the farthest point of our continental cultural expansion during the 19th Century. John Jacob Astor established Astoria, Oregon, in 1811, and his team blazed the trail which opened the Northwest to settlement. He led the economic battle to incorporate the Pacific Northwest, and its resources, into the United States. In those days, the borders between the United States and British Canada remained fluid.

~

Oregon’s coast, near where the eclipse will begin sliding across North America on August 21, 2017.

~

Our nation’s power and prosperity come in large part from our westward expansion to the Pacific, and the rich natural, human and energetic resources of our western states. This part of our country remains energetic, innovative and largely progressive.

Charleston, South Carolina, symbolizes the first shots fired in treasonous rebellion in our Civil War, which began in 1860-61. This terrible time in our nation’s history potentially could have destroyed our republic. But it did not; and the slow and torturous process of re-unification has played out in our courts, congress, statehouses and streets ever since.

~

The James River, just a few hundred miles north of where the coming eclipse will move offshore next Monday.

~

This is a critical time in our nation’s history once again. The nihilistic forces of nazism, facism, and communism which were pushed back in Europe and Asia during the 20th Century, have infiltrated our own society and American government in the 21st.

We see this with sickening clarity after the election cycle of 2016, when these forces of hatred and anarchy have been publicly emboldened both in the media, and on the ground in cities across our nation.

And only a week after the tragic and disturbing events in Charlottesville last weekend; we will experience the rare astronomical event of a full solar eclipse beginning in Oregon and ending on the coast at Charleston, South Carolina.

~

Jones Millpond, where The Battle of Williamsburg raged on May 5, 1862, in the early years of our nation’s Civil War; remains a peaceful spot along the Colonial Parkway in more recent times.

~

Many of us wonder what this means for our country. We are disgusted and uncertain with elements of our own government and citizenry. We are deeply troubled about what our nation’s future may hold, and wondering whether the Republic established by our Constitution in 1788 remains sufficient to order our society today.

At this time of uncertainty, we have given much thought to the meaning and potential effects of the coming eclipse. Historically, many cultures have viewed eclipses as important times of vulnerability as the sun disappeared from the sky, and dramatic changes occurred in the aftermath. There could be several interpretations of the phenomena of darkness falling across a huge swath of the United States, from coast to coast, in the middle of a summer afternoon.

We choose to interpret the coming eclipse as a time of national renewal. Beginning in the west, where our country’s economic destiny was determined with the founding of Astoria and securing our border with Canada; and sweeping eastwards across our nation to the very city where our Civil War began; the darkness of this eclipse will be followed by new light.

The emerging sun, Sol Invictus,  will shine brightly over our nation for many hours on Monday, August 21, after the moon moves on in its orbit, allowing the sun’s light to burst forth once again.

~

~

As morning follows night, we choose to focus on the ‘second morning’ that will occur as the eclipse ends on Monday afternoon as a time of national renewal and re invigoration. Let this ‘second morning’ usher in a time when our Constitutional government will be set right once again, and these current threats of tyranny, hatred, and lawlessness ended.

Let foreign intervention in our politics be exposed and expunged. Let nazis and their ideology, influencing our political discourse, be exposed and expunged.

Let the corrupting influence of foreign and criminally laundered money holding our political leaders to nihilistic political ideologies be exposed and expunged. Let the corruption and lawlessness in our own communities be exposed and expunged.

~

~

Let us use this energetically potent period of a summer solar eclipse to power the necessary changes which will re-claim our communities and our state and national governments for our founding principles of life, liberty, and the pursuit of the good.

Let us reclaim our heritage as a land of promise and equal protection for all under fair and just laws.

Let our United States fully become a center of innovation and opportunity; tolerance and love; and a haven for the endless positive potential of humankind.

Woodland Gnome 2017

~

Powhatan Creek

~

WPC: Unusual

Pacific City, Oregon in October 2016

~

The Daily Post’s Photo Challenge this week challenges us to publish a photo that is in someway unusual.  Photographer Lignum Draco challenges us to reach beyond our comfort zone of subject matter or technique, to feature a photo that is unique in some way.

I am sharing a series of previously discarded photos from my visit to the Oregon coast last October.  These were shot in the hours before a major storm hit the Pacific Northwest.

I was visiting Pacific City, Oregon, with my daughter and toddler granddaughter to enjoy some beach time together before the hurricane like storm socked us in for the next five days.  They were happily playing in the sand while I shot these images.

~

~

My daughter, a trained pilot, always reads the sky.  She pointed out the approaching front drawing near hours ahead of schedule.  We gathered up little one, despite her howling protests, and got her back to the car and us back to my hotel just as the wind picked up and the first squall line of rain passed over us.

Weathering such a dangerous storm in a rented hotel room, perched high on a cliff above the crashing Pacific, reminds us of how fragile our lives can be.  Listening to the howling wind banging the dumpster lids of nearby hotels that night, wondering whether our power would stay on, and watching reports of flooding, tornadoes and wind damage to nearby communities made us grateful for our relative safety and comfort together.  We had heat, fresh coffee, hot water, and our internet connection throughout.

These photos speak to me of a greater fragility, however.  They demonstrate the fragility of our biosphere and the vulnerability of the thin layer of vegetation our planet supports.

Normally, I show you lush photos of gardens filled with plants.  My photos are filled with rich greens and vividly colored leaves or flowers.  I photograph pollinators and other garden wildlife sipping nectar or hiding out in the relative cool of our garden.

~

~

Here, we see the truth of our life on this planet.  There is a thin strip of living green perched precariously on the underlying rock and soil of our Earth.  Once we destroy the vegetation, what is left won’t produce the oxygen we breathe or produce the crops which feed us.

Watching forests come down to make way for new shopping areas and town homes, vegetation ripped up for the inevitable widening of roads to make room for the growing population, and habitat destroyed for new power switching stations and pipelines has become a way of life in our country.  How short sighted the promise of profit can make us…..

I’m sharing an unusual subject, an unusual viewpoint, and an unusual mood through these photos today.  And I hope they will inspire us all to become fierce protectors of our planet Earth; our life-long mother and our larger home.

Woodland Gnome 2017
~
~
For the Daily Post’s
Weekly Photo Challenge:  Unusual

~

Siletz Bay, Lincoln City, Oregon October 2016

Honoring Earth Day

~

“Our Mother Earth is the source of all life, whether it be the plants, the two-legged, four-legged, winged ones or human beings.
“The Mother Earth is the greatest teacher, if we listen, observe and respect her.
“When we live in harmony with the Mother Earth, she will recycle the things we consume and make them available to our children and to their children.
“I must teach my children how to care for the Earth so it is there for the future generations.

~

~

“So from now on:

“I realize the Earth is our mother. I will treat her with honor and respect.
“I will honor the interconnectedness of all things and all forms of life. I will realize the Earth does not belong to us, but we belong to the Earth.

~

~

“The natural law is the ultimate authority upon the lands and water. I will learn the knowledge and wisdom of the natural laws. I will pass this knowledge on to my children.
“The mother Earth is a living entity that maintains life. I will speak out in a good way whenever I see someone abusing the Earth. Just as I would protect my own mother, so will I protect the Earth.
“I will ensure that the land, water, and air will be intact for my children and my children’s children – unborn.”
.
Anonymous, reprinted from WhiteWolfPack.com

 

~

~

Earth Day was first celebrated in 1970.  I was in grade school, and this new celebration felt like a very big deal to me.  I was happy for all of the efforts the ‘grown-ups’ were making to protect the air, water, land and wildlife.  It felt good. 

This new Earth Day celebration was a ray of hope, a spark of light in an otherwise very dark time in our country.  We were still using unspeakable weapons in Southeast Asia, destroying their forests with Napalm and their people with terror. Nixon and his cronies still controlled the White House.

The first nuclear weapons in modern times had been used against two Japanese cities only 25 years earlier, and the the arms race to develop and test more of these life-destroying weapons was exploding around the planet.

But, we also still had George Harrison and John Lennon in those days, and the millions of voices of the Woodstock Generation raised in song and protest.

So much has happened in these last 47 years.  Our lives have changed in unimaginable ways.  Our country has changed, too.  The Woodstock Generation has mostly spent their lives now in doing what they can, for good or for ill; before losing their voices and their mobility to the natural progression of things.

~

~

And their legacy lives on, in the rest of us ‘youngsters.’  The battles still rage across our planet between the special interests of our age.  There is a basic philosophical divide, as I see it, between those focused on preservation of the environment, sharing and preserving our resources for generations yet to come; and those focused on using up every resource they can to make a profit.

The divide is between those focused on themselves and their own profit and pleasure, and those whose focus and concern expands to include the good of the millions of voiceless plant and animal species , generations yet unborn, and our beautiful planet.

That is a stark oversimplification, I know.  And I would bet that many who read these words disagree with my interpretation of things.

~

~

Good people can disagree.  Well-intentioned people can see things differently.  We each have our own story to tell about life and our experiences, in our own way.

A neighbor said to me just the other day, “The Earth doesn’t have a problem.  The Earth has never had a problem with human beings.  It is the humans who want to continue living on this planet who have the problem.”

~

~

And he is right.  Actually, the more information which leaks out about Mars, and what has happened to that once beautiful planet over the last half a million years, the more we understand how fragile our own planetary biosphere to be.  Perhaps that is why our government has tried to control the many photos of man-made structures on Mars, and evidence of water and the life once living there, so fiercely.

~

~

So what can any of us do?  Each of us can choose something, or somethings, which are in our power to do that will make a positive impact on our biosphere’s, and our own, well-being.  And then, we can raise our own voice, and use the power of our own purse to influence our neighbors, and the greater human community, towards doing something constructive, too.

Here are a few ideas from the Earthday.org site to get us all started:

Create your own ‘Act of Green’

Plant a tree or donate a tree

Eat less meat

Stop using disposable plastic

Reduce your energy footprint

Educate others

~

~

I invite you to celebrate Earth Day 2017 in your own personal way.  Do something positive for yourself, your family, our planet and our future.  It doesn’t have to be something big, fancy or expensive.

Just do something to commit your own “Act of Green,” your own radical act of beauty.

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016-2017

~

~

“I do not think the measure of a civilization

is how tall its buildings of concrete are,

but rather how well its people have learned

to relate to their environment and fellow man.”

.

Sun Bear of the Chippewa Tribe

.

For the Daily Post’s

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Earth

~

WPC: Atop

~

“Indeed, I find that distance lends perspective

and I often write better of a place

when I am some distance from it.

One can be so overwhelmed by the forest

as to miss seeing the trees.”

.

Louis L’Amour

~

~

“Distance has the same effect on the mind as on the eye.”

.

Samuel Johnson

~

~

“The greatest risk to man

is not that he aims too high and misses,

but that he aims too low and hits.”

.

Michaelangelo

~

~

“A mountain still in the distance

can appear as a molehill.”

.

Howard Fast

~

~

“Utopia is a collective shift of perception away.

Abundance is all around us.

Only our efforts at tower-building blind us to it,

our gaze forever skyward,

forever seeking to escape this Earth,

this feeling, this moment.”

.

Charles Eisenstein

~

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016-2017

~

~

“My father says that there is only one perfect view —

the view of the sky straight over our heads,

and that all these views on earth

are but bungled copies of it.”

.

E.M. Forster

~

For the Daily Post’s

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Atop

WPC: Wish

~

Wishes,

like stepping stones across a pond;

hopscotch squares along a sidewalk;

rocks along the shore;

draw us onward.

~

~

They told us once,

“Conceive it, believe it, achieve it!”

And some of us believed it so, that

we could make our wishes true.

~

~

We wished, and wished again: 

on candles, stars, dandelions,

pennies, crystals, bones

Our wishes change through time.

~

~

Plant your wishes like seeds,

water them with loving intent,

Nurture their small beginnings,

knowing the harvest will come.

~

~

Magic lives in our imagining mind,

and manifests with each new sunrise,

leading us further on along the way….

Our way.

~

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2015-2017

~

~

For the Daily Post’s

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Wish

~

 

WPC: Tiny II

october-20-2016-oregon-trip-161

~

“Some  believe it is only great power

that can hold evil in check,

but that is not what I have found.

I found it is the small everyday deeds

of ordinary folk

that keep the darkness at bay:

small acts of kindness and love.”

.

Gandalf the Grey 

(J.R.R. Tolkien)

~

october-20-2016-oregon-trip-174

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

For the Daily Post’s

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Tiny

 

Sunday Dinner: Persevere

october-20-2016-oregon-trip-110

~

“To argue with a man who has renounced

the use and authority of reason,

and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt,

is like administering medicine to the dead,

or endeavoring to convert an atheist by scripture.”

.

Thomas Paine

~

october-20-2016-oregon-trip-108

~

“Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom,

must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it.”

.

Thomas Paine

~

These three photos from Siletz Bay, OR

~

“The harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.

What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly;

it is dearness only that gives everything its value.

I love the man that can smile in trouble,

that can gather strength from distress and grow.”

.

Thomas Paine

~

october-20-2016-oregon-trip-263

~

“Whatever is my right as a man

is also the right of another;

and it becomes my duty to guarantee

as well as to possess.”

.

Thomas Paine

~

oregon-trip-2016-031

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

“If there must be trouble, let it be in my day,

that my child may have peace.”

.

Thomas Paine

~

~

Thomas Paine ( 1737-1809) was an English-American political activist, author, political theorist and revolutionary.

As the author of two highly influential pamphlets at the start of the American Revolution, he inspired the Patriots in 1776 to declare independence from Britain.

His ideas reflected Enlightenment-era rhetoric of transnational human rights.   more… (Source:  Goodreads.com)

 

WPC: Transmogrify

october-28-2016-2016-garden-016

~

“Transmogrify: to change in appearance or form, especially strangely or grotesquely; transform.”

~

Ferns in the Connie Hansen Garden, Lincoln City, OR

Ferns in the Connie Hansen Garden, Lincoln City, OR

~

Isn’t this a great word for October?  Especially as we prepare for that most transformative of holidays, Halloween or Samhain; when we focus on our fear of change.

This isn’t the sweet and uplifting change of bare branches breaking into springtime blossoms and emerging daffodils.  We now find ourselves at the other side of the wheel of the year:  Autumn, where our garden begins to disintegrate as we head towards winter.

~

Rudbeckia fading in our garden as the Salvia keeps getting better

Rudbeckia fading in our garden as the Salvia keeps getting better.

~

Flowers transform into dry seedheads;  leaves lose their green and blow down from our trees onto the lawn.  Frost kills our tender annuals, and much of our garden withers.

What was so lovely a few weeks ago has grown grotesque.  Green stems turn brown, then grey.  Plump and healthy plants twist and shrivel.  We’re left with frost blasted perennials and the  naked skeletons of trees.  And we find ourselves left with this mess to tidy up sometime between now and the coming spring.

~

Once mighty tree turned into driftwood on an Oregon beach near Pacific City.

A once mighty tree turned into driftwood, on an Oregon beach near Pacific City.

~

But since both spring and fall are simply two sides of the same annual cycle, we also find closure and balance in autumn’s path.

There are ripe seeds to gather and sow, perennials to divide, and fruits to harvest.   There is beauty in the garden, still.

~

Basil and Salvia in our garden

Basil and Salvia in our garden this week, where ripe seeds stand alonside new flowers, much to the goldfinches’ delight!

~

Autumn’s lesson reflects the wisdom of the Hindu god, Shiva:  Destruction of the old precedes  creation of the new.  It is the lesson of compost; the truth of a seed splitting itself open so that a tender new shoot may emerge;  the dark wisdom of all fertility.

Gardening is about transformation.  Our only constant remains constant change.

And transmogrification, our garden in autumn, prepares the way for a new springtime beginning.

~

october-20-2016-oregon-trip-025

~

For the Daily Post’s

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Transmogrify

~

Re-blooming Iris open alongside Allium seeds and fading perennials.

Re-blooming Iris ‘Rosalie Figee’ opens alongside Allium seeds and Rudbeckia in our garden.

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

~

october-28-2016-2016-garden-018

 

 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 546 other followers

Follow Forest Garden on WordPress.com
Order Classic Caladiums

This Month’s Posts

Topics of Interest