Sunday Dinner: Coincidence

~

“I don’t think that anything happens by coincidence…
No one is here by accident…
Everyone who crosses our path has a message for us.
Otherwise they would have taken another path,
or left earlier or later.
The fact that these people are here
means that they are here for some reason”…
.
James Redfield

~

~

“I’ve often noticed that when coincidences start happening
they go on happening
in the most extraordinary way.
I dare say it’s some natural law
that we haven’t found out.”
.
Agatha Christie

~

~

“I like coincidences.
Seems like when you have a coincidence
it is a clue to how the world all fits together,
even though things
may look to be wide apart.”
.
Marilyn Oser

~

~

“I do believe in Providence.
There have been far too many
tiny perfect coincidences in my life.
At some point,
they cease to be coincidences.”
.
Caspar Vega

~

~

“We cannot see how our lives will unfold.
What is destiny and What is accident?
And how can one ever be certain?”
.
Cathy Ostlere

~

~

“If we stay aware
and acknowledge the great mystery that is this life,
we will see that we have been perfectly placed,
in exactly the right position…
to make all the difference in the world.”
.
James Redfield

~

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2019

~

~

“Of course, a story always begins
with such a coincidence.”
.
Kōji Suzuki

~

 

Advertisements

Fabulous Friday: Timing is Everything

~

A common topic of conversation among gardeners this time of year resolves to timing.   We try to gauge where we are in the annual rite of spring, and guess what the weather might still do in the weeks ahead.  Of course, we’re eager to get a jump on the new season.  We want to clean up the beds and begin planting.  We want to get the season off to a good start and enjoy the fruits of our efforts as early as possible.

~

~

Yet, we have all experienced the disappointments that come with beginning too early…

Many favorite plants won’t grow until the soil has warmed enough, and until night time temperatures remain reasonably warm, too.  It’s not just the rare late freeze that worries us, either.

A long list of plants, from tomatoes to Caladiums want night time temperatures above 50F.   Begin too early, and a plant’s growth may be stunted for the entire season.

~

~

I just shake my head when I see tomatoes shivering on grocery and big-box store plant racks in March or early April.  The soil is still too cold here, for summer vegetables, and we can still have a freeze or late snow deep into April.

And every year unfolds differently.  We ride a metaphorical meteorological roller coaster through this most changeable of seasons.  Today, we had warm southwest winds ahead of a line of thunderstorms and it was nearly 80F by 2 PM.

~

Edgeworthia chrysantha blooms abundantly in late winter, filling the garden with sweet fragrance.

~

We have several nights of freezing temperatures forecast for the coming week.  There was mention of the ‘S’ word for Tuesday, and I am hoping that is rubbed from the forecast before frosty flakes can touch our Magnolia blossoms.

~

~

We were just amazed to notice our neighbor’s tulip Magnolia tree in full, glorious bloom yesterday afternoon.  When did that happen? It only takes a few hours of warmth to wake up the garden, when the dormant time is nearly done.

~

~

I believe that most of us are as interested in phenology as we are in the actual weather forecast.  Especially in this time when our climate patterns seem to be shifting, we need  a better compass to navigate the seasons.

Phenology, literally, is the study of appearance.  In other words, studying when things in the natural world appear or disappear; when various things happen in relation to other things.  Phenology is the study of how biological changes in plants and animals correspond with changes in climate and seasons.

~

Magnolia stellata buds are opening this week, in our garden.

~

“You may delay,
but time will not.”
.
Benjamin Franklin

~

~

This is very old wisdom, dating to long before most folks had computers, watches, or even reliable calendars.  How do you know when to plant corn?  When oak leaves are as big as a mouse’s ears.

Noticing the arrival of the first robins is a sign of spring.  Watching geese gather and fly overhead in large flocks is a sign of approaching winter.

~

~

As our climate warms, spring continues to arrive a bit earlier, and fall lingers a bit later each year.  But we still look for indicators of these changes in real time, and try to adjust our gardening schedules to make the most of the growing season.

~

An approaching storm darkened our skies, even as temperatures soared here this afternoon.

~

I’m feeling pretty confident about spring, finally.  Confident enough to do a bit of shopping for perennials yesterday.  Our friends at The Homestead Garden Center got in their annual shipment of 2″ perennials this week, and we went for a visit to celebrate the opening of another spring season with them.  Sweetness filled the air from rows of blooming bulbs, shelves of primroses, , flats of bright pansies and an impromptu alle’ of Camellia shrubs covered in huge pink flowers.

~

~

I went straight for the shelves of plump green perennials, fresh out of their greenhouse, to match up my wish-list with the bounty of the offerings.

It may be a little premature to plant them… After a conversation with a Master Gardener friend, yesterday morning, about whether or not the soil has warmed enough to plant; I disciplined my urge to plant yesterday afternoon.  It certainly was warm enough to enjoy every moment out of doors.

~

N. ‘Katie Heath,’ one of Brent Heath’s most beautiful introductions, and named for his mother.

~

But I recalled the forecast for next week, and left the little perennials snug in their flat, in the shade and shelter of a hedge.  Better to bring them indoors should cold come calling once again, than to let them get frost kissed outside.  Oh, I chafe against the indecision of it all!

~

~

But I did buy carrots today.  No, not for roasting or soup… for flowers It has become an annual tradition to seek out the most beautiful organic carrots I can find to plant in the garden.

~

~

I experimented with planting carrots for the first time in late winter of 2017.  We enjoyed them so much, that I planted carrots again last spring.  For only pennies per plant, we enjoy months of flowers.  More importantly, Daucus carota, or common carrot, proves a useful host plant for our Black Swallowtail butterflies.

~

Daucus carota subsp. sativus attracts many beneficial insects to the garden.

~

I sorted through the bag of colorful carrots from Trader Joe’s today to find the best ones for planting.  I was looking for a reasonable length of healthy root with the promise of fresh leaves from an intact crown.  I have those resting on the counter in a shallow pan of water, and will plant them out in the coming days.

~

Our little Eastern Black Swallowtail caterpillar was growing fast, happily munching on the Daucus carota last summer.

~

It is simple:  open the earth with a spade and slip the carrot, vertically, into the opening.  Leave the crown just at ground level, and mulch lightly.

I know we lost a fair amount of the carrots I planted last year, probably to rabbits or voles.  I plan to give these a good squirt with Repels All before I plant them, just as I protected some of our bulbs last fall,  as a bit of insurance.  I expect that it is warm enough now that these carrots will send out new feeder roots in short order, and we’ll see new growth by mid-April.

~

The garden is moist and ready for planting….

~

Have you started any seeds yet?  It’s that time of year. 

Puzzling out the best time for each step towards our summer garden takes a bit of planning, a fair bit of remembering past years, and also a bit of trust that our efforts will flourish.

~

~

 Woodland Gnome 2019

~

~

“It’s being here now that’s important.
There’s no past and there’s no future.
Time is a very misleading thing.
All there is ever, is the now.
We can gain experience from the past,
but we can’t relive it;
and we can hope for the future,
but we don’t know if there is one.”

.

George Harrison

~

~

Fabulous Friday:
Happiness is Contagious; Let’s Infect One Another!

Sunday Dinner: Curiouser and Curiouser…

~
“I set out to discover the why of it,
and to transform my pleasure
into knowledge.”
.
Charles Baudelaire
~
~
“Children, be curious.
Nothing is worse (I know it)
than when curiosity stops.
Nothing is more repressive
than the repression of curiosity.
Curiosity begets love.
It weds us to the world.
It’s part of our perverse, madcap love
for this impossible planet we inhabit.
People die when curiosity goes.
People have to find out,
people have to know.”
.
Graham Swift
~
~
“Remember that things
are not always as they appear to be…
Curiosity creates possibilities
and opportunities.”
.
Roy T. Bennett
~
~
“Thinkers aren’t limited by what they know,
because they can always increase what they know.
Rather they’re limited by what puzzles them,
because there’s no way to become curious
about something that doesn’t puzzle you.”
.
Daniel Quinn
~
~
“The days on which one has been the most inquisitive
are among the days on which one has been happiest.”
.
Robert Lynd
~
~
“The whole art of teaching
is only the art of awakening
the natural curiosity of the mind
for the purpose of satisfying it
afterwards.”
.
Anatole France
~
~
“When you sneak into somebody’s backyard,
it does seem that guts and curiosity are working together.
Curiosity can bring guts out of hiding at times,
maybe even get them going.
But curiosity usually evaporates.
Guts have to go for the long haul.
Curiosity’s like a fun friend you can’t really trust.
It turns you on and then it leaves you
to make it on your own-
with whatever guts you can muster.”
.
Haruki Murakami
~
~
Photos by Woodland Gnome 2019
~
~
“Learning is by nature curiosity…
prying into everything, reluctant to leave anything,
material or immaterial,
unexplained.”
.
Philo
~
~
“Curiosity is the hunger of the mind.”
.
Lance Conrad
~

 

WPC: Solitude

january-24-2017-jamestown-028

~

“If our friendship depends on things like space and time,

then when we finally overcome space and time,

we’ve destroyed our own brotherhood!

But overcome space, and all we have left is Here.

Overcome time, and all we have left is Now.

And in the middle of Here and Now,

don’t you think that we might

see each other once or twice?”

.

Richard Bach

~

january-24-2017-jamestown-027

~

“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,
There is a rapture on the lonely shore,
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep sea, and music in its roar:
I love not man the less, but Nature more”

.

George Gordon Byron

~

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2017

~

feb-2-2017-new-growth-016

~

For the Daily Post’s

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Solitude

 

 

Hidden Jewels: Hellebores

February 24, 2014 snowdrops 027

~

Hellebores begin their grow in the middle of winter, sending up fresh new leaves and flower scapes under cover of their sturdy, evergreen leaves left standing from the previous season.    These thick, protective leaves offer cover from freezing temperatures, snow, ice, and winter winds.

~

January 26 2014 ice 004

Hellebores in late January, finally emerging from several inches of snow.

~

Although they may begin to look a bit ragged by February, Helleborus leaves are still vibrantly green in our garden.  It is only when these long, thick  leaves are finally cut away that the dazzling jewel like buds of the new season’s flowers finally shine.

Within just a few days of removing the cover of old leaves, light reaches the new growth, causing it to lengthen and the buds to open.  New flowers and leaves will soon fill out the display.

~

~

Hellebores are hardy perennials, growing in moist shady spots in zones 5-8.  Native to much of Northern Europe from the British Isles eastwards to Turkey, the original species have been heavily hybridized to produce countless different combinations of form and color.

Although often called “Christmas Rose” and “Lenten Rose” for their season of bloom, the 20 or so species of Helleborus are not related at all to roses.  Rather, their common name refers to the open rosette shape of their bloom when fully open.

~

~

Hellebore blossoms are only fully appreciated when viewed up close.  Most cultivars hold their blossoms facing downwards.  One must come in close and lift each blossom to see its face.

~

February 24, 2014 snowdrops 015

~

Most Helleborus blossoms bloom in shades of white, cream, pink, peach, lilac, burgundy, or dark purple.  Many have “freckles” on their faces.  Some Helleborus flowers are entirely green, including H. odorus and the beautiful H. foetidus.  Others,  may be a shade of green with pink or purple markings.

~

February 24, 2014 snowdrops 014~

Although Hellebores are widely available through mail order nurseries, this is one plant I prefer to buy in person, when it is in bloom.  I want to see the flower and buy a sturdy, well developed plant.

I’ve planted Hellebores in pots during the winter, with Violas and evergreen fern, in full sun areas.  It is important to lift and transplant these Hellebores to mostly shady areas before the middle of May, in our area, so the plant isn’t burned by the summer sun.

~

~

One of the prettiest Hellebores, with variegated foliage, is H. argutifolius  ‘Snow Fever.’  Its new leaves and flower buds emerge tipped in pink.  Its creamy flowers have a cast of light green.  This one has not proven as reliably hardy in a pot as H. orientalis, but it remains worth the effort.

~

Helleborus argutifolius ‘Snow Fever’

~

Hellebores enjoy winter and spring sunshine, but appreciate the leafy canopy of trees during the summer.  They grow well in partial shade under large shrubs or deciduous trees.

If planted under a tree, make sure the plant gets sufficient moisture all summer.  Thirsty tree roots often grow up into plantings and rob the perennials of needed moisture when the beds aren’t kept well watered.

~

~

I lost two beautiful Hellebores last year by transplanting them in late spring, under trees, and not keeping them well watered through the entire season.  I also planted them a little too high.  The crown of the plant should be at, or slightly below ground level, and the area around the roots well mulched.

~

This two year old seedling was transplanted into a fern bed last summer.

This two year old seedling was transplanted into a fern bed last summer.

~

Many of the Hellebores available at nurseries are hybrids, and so the seedlings won’t match the parent plants.  Hellebores do set great quantities of viable seeds, and so you’ll find hundreds of little seedlings coming up nearby.  These can be transplanted in spring, cared for, and grown out to see what flowers will develop.

Don’t expect seedlings to reproduce the  flowers on an expensive hybrid, but do give the plant a chance.  You may be pleasantly surprised with the flowers which do develop.  There are so many seedlings from a mature plant that you have plenty to generously share with gardening friends and to expand your own collection.

~

Helleborus hybrids can be found in many unusual colors.

~

Every part of a Helleborus plant is poisonous, from flower to root.  This means they won’t be nibbled by voles or deer.

Spread the older leaves you cut away on the ground anywhere you are troubled by moles or voles, and the poisonous alkaloids will be transferred to the soil.  It is wise to wear gloves when planting Hellebores, trimming their leaves, or cutting their flowers.

~

~

My first Hellebores were a gift from a dear friend who grows a yard full of them.  We dug dozens of seedlings from her garden one day in early summer, and I brought them home and tucked them into new raised beds I was building.  They took off in the rich compost, quickly filling the bed.

Sadly, where I tucked seedlings into the ground without first building up a new bed of compost, they struggled.  The seedlings planted into a well prepared bed bloomed the following spring.  Those planted in other areas did not.

~

February 24, 2014 snowdrops 022

~

Hellebores tend to be more expensive than some other perennials because they don’t bloom their first year.  When you buy a plant in bloom, it is already several years old.  If transplanting your own seedlings, expect a few years of foliage only before the first flowers appear.

Hellebores form wonderful ground cover in shady areas, and require very little care.  Although they look unremarkable during much of the year, their winter and early spring bloom make them well worth the effort.  By planting several different varieties you can enjoy Helleborus blooms from December through May.

~

February 24, 2014 snowdrops 021~

I’ve noticed that most of the best gardeners in our community grow Hellebores.

Many cultivars of Helleborus, especially H. odoratus, grow well in the conditions our gardens offer.  In fact, they are on the “short list” of flowering perennials which thrive here.

~

February 2017 Helleborus

~

Mix Hellebores with ferns, mosses, Hostas, Epimediums, Brunnera,  and other shade loving perennials.  Once past their bloom, the Hellebores leaves will form a solid backdrop for other plants throughout the summer.

Cut, Hellebores last for a long time in the vase.  One of the few cut flowers we can grow here in Zone 7b during the winter, they work well in arrangements with early daffodils and forced flowering branches of shrubs or fruit trees.

February 24, 2014 snowdrops 018~

Hellebores are another heritage plant which continue year to year with little effort from the gardener.  Trimming their old leaves, keeping them watered, and feeding once or twice each year with a mulch of compost is all they really require if planted in the proper spot in the garden.

They reward this little effort with lovely jewel like flowers when we most need them, during these last few frosty weeks of late winter and earliest spring.

~

~

All photos by Woodland Gnome 2014-2018

~

February 24, 2014 snowdrops 020
~
More about Hellebores on Forest Garden:
The Beauty of Hellebores
Helleborus argutifolius ‘Snow Fever’
Why I Love Those Plants of Ill Repute
Plan Now For Winter Flowers

When Your Garden Looks Like Swiss Cheese- Living with Moles and Voles

Moles have large paddle like feet to tunnel through soil. They prefer to eat invertebrates like insects and insect larvae. Image by Michael David Hill, Wikimedia

Moles and voles go wherever they want to go, and eat whatever they want to eat.   They leave raised tunnels in lawns and garden beds.  Both are small mammals, about 4″-6″ long as adults, and both live underground.  Moles prefer to eat insects, earthworms, and larvae that live in the top few inches of soil.  Voles, which look like mice, are herbivores; preferring to eat roots, grass, seeds, and whatever plant material they can drag down into their tunnels.

These destructive critters love freshly dug soil and newly planted plants; a real problem for many gardeners.  When you plant out a bed of transplants voles think you’ve prepared them a luscious buffet.  We’ve had newly purchased plants simply disappear overnight, eaten before they could even root into the surrounding soil.

As many moles or voles as you trap or kill, there seems to be a constant supply of new ones ready to take over the yard, with new ones born regularly between May and October.  There damage tends to be worse after a good rain when the ground is soft.

~

A vole hole under a fern in a shaded area is only one of at least four networked holes all connected with tunnels.

~

We’ve noticed that mole and vole activity seems to be worse in shaded areas than sunny, and that they go crazy under any area mulched with bark or leaves.  We’ve had whole areas dug up in a single night, and have even found them tunneling under some lawn during the day.  These guys will just destroy new plants and tear up the ground if left unchecked.  Worse, in our yard, we’ve found snakes also use the vole holes and tunnels for their own purposes.

Some people will bait the tunnels with poison, but I choose not to use poisons, especially since we have neighboring outside cats.  Some people leave traps to catch moles and voles.  But then you have to do something with the creatures once trapped.

Eliminating all moles and voles isn’t going to happen in a forested neighborhood with lots of green space, but, there are some things you can do to slow them down.

~

Vole hole, through an earlier patch of gravel, and surrounding tunnels in the lawn.

Vole hole, through an earlier patch of gravel, and surrounding tunnels in the lawn.

~

First, we destroy the tunnels and holes whenever and wherever we find them.  We stomp the tunnels flat, and fill the entrance holes with pea gravel.  If you find one hole, there will probably be another nearby.  Before I started filling the holes with pea gravel, we put rocks, bottle caps, moth balls, and other treasures into the tunnels to obstruct them.  Moth balls are especially effective at chasing these critters out of a particular tunnel.

Over the years, we have also stumbled across a non-poisonous way to eliminate some of the ‘activity.’  A friend tipped us off to using chewing gum as a bait.  We use sticks of Double Mint or Juicy Fruit gum, still in its wrapper, and torn into three or four portions per stick.  When we find a hole or tunnel, we simply push one of these little baits into the earth before we stomp the tunnel or fill the hole.  This method has proven helpful in reducing the population.

A product called “Milky Spore,” which is a powdered bacterium, can be sprinkled on lawns.  One application will allow this bacteria to grow in your soil, killing off the larvae of the Japanese beetle.  These larvae are a major food source for moles, and many find that using milky spore reduces the tunneling in their lawn.

Milky spore is not poisonous, won’t harm pets or other wildlife, lasts in the soil for years, and is widely available in hardware stores and garden centers.  As a bonus, it will reduce the Japanese beetle population, which may feed on your roses and other perennials in early summer.

~

Gravel and Plant Tone ready to be mixed into the bottom of a  planting hole.

~

When planting anything new, I mix pea gravel into the “back-fill” under and around the plant.  The gravel can improve drainage in the soil, and will slow voles down as they try to attract the roots of a plant.  I also mulch around newly planted beds with pea gravel to slow down the squirrels who may want to dig them up.

~

Use pea gravel in the "back-fill" soil under and around new plantings, and then mulch around the new plant with pea grave. This discourages moles and voles from eating the roots of your new plant, and discourages squirrels from digging around it. Herbs benefit from the reflected heat and sunlight, and the soil is held in place on a slope.

Use pea gravel in the “back-fill” soil under and around new plantings, and then mulch around the new plant with pea grave. This discourages moles and voles from eating the roots of your new plant, and discourages squirrels from digging around it.  Herbs benefit from the reflected heat and sunlight, and the soil is held in place on a slope.

~

You might also create a ‘living fence’ of poisonous roots around an area that you need to protect from hungry voles.  You will find that there are many plants with poisonous or irritating compounds in their roots, stems and leaves.  My favorite plants to use this way are Narcissus and Hellebores.  Plant these plants around shrubs whose roots you want to protect, in mixed borders, and as a barrier around areas of lawn.

Narcissus, planted a bulbs in the fall, are an fairly inexpensive investment and multiply over the years.  They grow all winter long and bloom in the spring.  Although their leaves die back in early summer, their roots and bulbs continue to work as a barrier year round.

~

Narcissus are beautiful but poisonous. Their bulbs and roots can form a ‘living fence’ to protect other plants form hungry voles.

~

Hellebores, an evergreen herbaceous perennial, are available in garden centers from late autumn through the spring.  They bloom from late December through early May, and serve as a ground cover through the summer months.  They have large, fibrous root systems.

~

Hellebores bloom through the winter months, but their large root system can protect an area from voles year round.

~

Once established, Hellebores produce lots of seedlings, which you can transplant to new areas you want to protect.  Most gardeners cut back the old Helleborus leaves in the spring to make way for new growth.  Consider using old, ragged Hellebores leaves you’ve trimmed back as a mulch around other plants you want to protect.  As the leaves decay, their poisonous compounds enter the soil.

~

A new raised bed, bordered by recycled bricks, is filled with topsoil and compost, ready for planting.

A new raised bed, bordered by recycled bricks, is filled with topsoil and compost, ready for planting.

~

The best plan to protect your garden from mole and vole damage is to grow in raised beds.  When you build the bed, put a layer of chicken wire or landscaping fabric on the ground; follow with a shallow layer of gravel, then newspaper, cardboard, or brown paper shopping bags.  This suppresses the grown of any grass or weeds up into your new bed.  It will break down quickly, and help retain moisture under the roots as it enriches the soil.   Build the walls of your bed from wood, rock or masonry as tall as you need them, and fill the bed with topsoil and compost.

Laying landscape fabric or chicken wire under a new raised bed will keep the voles from eating the roots of your plants.  You might also use the Hugelkulture method of building a new bed on top of sticks, branches, leaves, or chipped wood.  This woody barrier will also help stop tunneling moles or voles.

You may need to slice through the bed’s lining to plant shrubs or other deeply rooted perennials, but your plants will be protected.  Many plants will grow more vigorously in a raised bed, especially if your soil is compacted or depleted.  It is very easy to plant into the fresh soil.

This is also an easy bed to maintain, and will never need tilling.  Simply add a few inches of compost each spring, and move plants in and out as the season dictates.

~

March raised bed

~

Plants grown in raised beds and containers grow much better than plants put directly into the soil around our home.  We get larger, lusher plants, with more flowers and fruits; probably because their roots can find plenty of moisture, air and nutrition and aren’t attacked by hungry voles!

The steep grade of our yard makes traditional double digging or tilling not only impractical, but dangerous.  Building up above the present soil makes more sense, gives a better result, and allows us to put down layers of material to stop the moles and voles from digging up to get the roots of our plants.

~

Our new butterfly garden in May.

~

If you have been frustrated in your efforts to garden or even maintain a lawn by hungry moles and voles, take heart.  There are things you can do to reduce or eliminate the damage they cause, without resorting to poisons.  Once you understand them, you can find ways to reduce their access to the food they seek, and protect both your landscaping investment and your peace of mind.

~

Daffodil bulbs planted at a depth of 8″, and about 6″ apart all around the root ball to protect it from voles.

~

Woodland Gnome 2013
Updated 2018

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 654 other followers

Follow Forest Garden on WordPress.com
Order Classic Caladiums

This Month’s Posts

Topics of Interest