Love and Memory

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“We are all the pieces of what we remember.
We hold in ourselves the hopes and fears
of those who love us.
As long as there is love and memory,
there is no true loss.”
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Cassandra Clare
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“Give sorrow words;
the grief that does not speak
knits up the o-er wrought heart
and bids it break.”
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William Shakespeare
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“His talent was as natural
as the pattern that was made by the dust
on a butterfly’s wings.
At one time he understood it no more
than the butterfly did,
and he did not know when it was brushed or marred.
Later he became conscious of his damaged wings
and of their construction
and he learned to think and could not fly any more
because the love of flight was gone
and he could only remember
when it had been effortless.”
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Ernest Hemingway
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“Letting go is the lesson.
Letting go is always the lesson.
Have you ever noticed
how much of our agony
is all tied up with craving and loss?”
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Susan Gordon Lydon
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Photos by Woodland Gnome 2017
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“When those you love die,
the best you can do is honor their spirit
for as long as you live.
You make a commitment
that you’re going to take whatever lesson that person …
was trying to teach you,
and you make it true in your own life…
it’s a positive way
to keep their spirit alive in the world,
by keeping it alive in yourself.”
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Patrick Swayze
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Leaf II: Celebration

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Caladiums speak to me of celebration.  They remain bright and colorful, full of beautiful surprises as each new leaf unfolds to unveil its own unique patterns and colors.

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Hot and humid summer days bring out the best in Caladiums.  Their leaves grow enormous, especially after summer rainstorms leave their soil warm and moist.  Near 100% humidity and languid summer breezes set them slow dancing with one another.  I give them an occasional cocktail of seaweed and fish emulsion to keep them perky and growing strong.

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A garden filled with beautiful foliage needs few flowers.  Each year we give more and more garden space to Caladiums, and their Aroid cousins Colocasias and Alocasias while growing fewer high-maintenance flowers.  However beautiful, flowers soon fade and must be cut away.  I love flowers, and yet don’t love the deadheading required for most, to keep them coming over a long season and their bed tidy.

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Colocasia ‘Majito’ grows in its new blue  pot on the left, and Alocasia ‘Stingray’ is just getting started in its pot on the right. Both will grow to a statuesque 4′-6′ tall be summer’s end.   A red coleus grows to the far left, and some red flowered annual Verbena is beginning to fill in beneath the foliage plants.  Colocasia prefers very moist soil, so I often stand its pot in a saucer to hold water.

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I have always loved to celebrate the joy and beauty of summer.  It is a time for getting together with family and friends, for travel, for long hours on the beach, for cook-outs and for celebrating life.  Caladiums in the garden set the stage for celebration, while asking precious little from the gardener in return, to keep them beautiful well into fall.

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There is still plenty of time for many of us to plant Caladiums for this summer. Garden centers around here still have a good selection of Caladiums already growing in pots, and many of them can be found on the summer sales.  But if you want to order a special variety, the tubers will need only a few weeks to establish and grow leaves once you plant them.

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You can still order the tubers of your choice from Florida growers, get them quickly, and have your Caladiums in leaf by mid-August.  They will grow beautifully in your garden until frost, and then you can keep the tubers to start again early next spring.

Let’s keep the celebration going as long as we can.

Woodland Gnome 2017

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In this new series, “Leaf,” I will share some of our favorite foliage plants.  Summer is prime time for big, bold, dramatic leaves.  I hope you enjoy seeing our favorites.  
Leaf I:  Illumination

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Fabulous Friday: Caladium Leaves

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Here we are smack in the middle of June, and our Caladiums are finally taking their places in our garden.  It has been slow-growing this year, I’m afraid.  The weather here has been ‘iffy.’  As in, the Caladiums would be growing much better if the weather would just settle down with some consistency.

These tropical beauties love heat.  And we’ve had some pretty miserably hot days already.  But then we get a cool spell, and  a few dull rainy days, and they slow down again.  But the good news is that those ‘Moonlight’ tubers I planted directly into a pot in early May are finally growing.  I was holding my breath on those, but they are indeed alive and I see leaves on three of them.

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Caladium ‘Sweet Carolina,’ back for its second year in our garden.

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And the big bin of Caladiums I’ve held back in the garage for the last few weeks is emptied into the garden today, along with the odd bits and pieces of new tubers I planted a bit late.

Yes, it was another cool day here today, between waves of rain.  And I decided to make the most of it in a marathon of planting.  All the odd left-over pieces finally fit into the garden, somehow, and I’m ready to stroll about and simply admire it for the next few months!

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I like this new Caladium, ‘Highlighter.’ It is supposed to be chartreuse, but so far is a lovely ivory with pink markings.

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There has been an abundance of Caladiums this year, and I believe I’ve filled nearly every nook and niche that could support them.  There were the many tubers we dug, dried and saved through winter.  Nearly every one of those sprouted, and were the first batch I planted in late April.

The new ones came in the post about the time the first crop was ready for the garden.  I started those in several waves, and it was these new ones I was planting out today.

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C. ‘Miss Muffet’ sparkles. This one  is in its third summer in our garden.

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I was amazed:  Some of the new Caladiums, planted into my nursery boxes in potting soil in late April, were only just beginning to sprout.  I hope that now that they are outside in our summer weather, they will take off and grow.  They were nestled among the roots of the very tall Caladiums that have been growing (and stretching) in the garage.

We’ve somehow ended up with an abundance of white Caladium varieties this year.  In addition to ‘Moonlight,’ ‘White Queen’ and ‘White Christmas;’ there are a few ‘Sweet Carolina’ saved from last summer, and the new Caladium varieties, ‘White Delight’ and ‘Highlighter.’  These cool white leaves shine in the shade, and make me feel better on steamy summer days.

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C. ‘Florida Sweetheart’

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Caladiums left tucked in pots of Begonias, and other tender perennials that overwintered in our garage, have awakened now, too. They’ve all been outside for a month or more, and I”m finding their little leaves poking through the soil below the other plants.  How fabulous that they survived another winter!  Each one noticed, brings it’s own happiness.  And I am sure that more will show themselves in the weeks coming.

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Caladiums  fall in that wonderful group of ‘easy’ plants to grow.  Once started, they ask for little beyond enriched, moist soil.  No need to prune, deadhead, stake or spray; they simply keep on pumping out gorgeous leaves until autumn’s chill shuts down their performance for another season.

We’ll enjoy them here for another four or five months, and then start the cycle again by digging, drying, and tucking the tubers safely away for the winter.  As I dug their planting holes in the garden today, lacing each with a little Bulb Tone, I admired our Caladiums with the happy satisfaction of knowing that the best is yet to come.

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Woodland Gnome 2017

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Fabulous Friday:  Happiness is contagious, Let’s infect one another!

Wednesday Vignettes: Summer Love

C. 'White Christmas'

Caladium ‘White Christmas’

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“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth

find reserves of strength

that will endure as long as life lasts.”

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Rachel Carson

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Caladium 'White Queen'

Caladium ‘White Queen’

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“Mere color, unspoiled by meaning,

and unallied with definite form,

can speak to the soul in a thousand different ways. ”

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Oscar Wilde

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Caladium 'Desert Sunset' develped by Dr. Robert Hartman of Classic Caladiums LLC.

Caladium ‘Desert Sunset’ hybridized by Dr. Robert Hartman of Classic Caladiums LLC.

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“Live in each season as it passes;

breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit,

and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.”

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Henry David Thoreau

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Caladium 'Moonlight' is an older white variety which prefers full shade.

Caladium ‘Florida Moonlight’

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“Why do two colors, put one next to the other, sing?

Can one really explain this? no.

Just as one can never learn how to paint.”

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Pablo Picasso

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Caladium 'Miss Muffet'

Caladium ‘Miss Muffet’

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The scientist does not study nature

because it is useful to do so.

He studies it because he takes pleasure in it,

and he takes pleasure in it because it is beautiful.

If nature were not beautiful

it would not be worth knowing,

and life would not be worth living.

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Henri Poincaré

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June 27, 2014 garden at dusk 041

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“Nature does nothing uselessly.”

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Aristotle

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Sometimes it works to have several of the same plant growing together in a pot. Here, several cultivars of Caladium share the space.

Assorted Caladiums.  On the right, C. ‘Lance Whorton’  blooms.

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“Let me, O let me bathe my soul in colours;

let me swallow the sunset and drink the rainbow.”

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Kahlil Gibran

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Caladium 'Lance Whorton'

Caladium ‘Lance Whorton’

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“Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.”

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Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Caladium 'Florida Sweetheart'

Caladium ‘Florida Sweetheart’

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“My garden is my most beautiful masterpiece”

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Claude Monet

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Caladium 'Sweet Carolina'

Caladium ‘Sweet Carolina’

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Photos by Woodland Gnome 2014-2016

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Caladium '

Sunday Dinner: The Key

August 2, 2016 Crepe Myrtle 014

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“The meaning of life is to find your gift.

The purpose of life is to give it away.”

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Pablo Picasso

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July 18, 2016 mugs 016

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“I do not seek. I find.”

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Pablo Picasso

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July 31, 2016 flowers 023

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“He can who thinks he can,

and he can’t who thinks he can’t.

This is an inexorable, indisputable law.”

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Pablo Picasso

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July 31, 2016 flowers 021

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Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016

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July 26, 2016 leaves 035

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“Action is the foundational key to all success. ”

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Pablo Picasso

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July 26, 2016 leaves 037

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“Go and do the things you can’t.
That is how you get to do them.”

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Pablo Picasso

Bright Christmas

August 3, 2016 Oxalis 005

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Caladium ‘White Christmas’ simply glows, illuminated by our August afternoon sun.  These grow beneath a white Crepe Myrtle tree.   You might notice a few white blossoms fallen to the ground beside the Caladiums.

This is a good pairing because the Crepe Myrtle offers filtered shade for our Caladium bed, and the Caladiums fill the space beneath the tree with movement, color and interest.

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August 2, 2016 Crepe Myrtle 004

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Both Crepe Myrtles and Caladiums grow happily and easily in our garden.  Neither suffers from munching or pests and they require minimal care, while giving maximum pleasure.  This is a great gift for Virginia gardeners; a gift of beauty which lasts for many weeks.

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Calaldiums also pair well with impatiens. These C. 'White Christmas' grow in my parents' garden.

Calaldiums also pair well with impatiens. These C. ‘White Christmas’ grow in my parents’ garden.

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It is good to have reliable plants in your gardener’s ‘palette’ which you can turn to again and again.  These beautiful white leaves, and white flowers, keep the garden bright during the toughest months of our summer season.

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C. 'White Christmas' looks crisp and cool planted with ferns.

C. ‘White Christmas’ looks crisp and cool planted with ferns.

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They create an illusion of coolness.  And the Caladiums will maintain their beauty until hit by frost.  Crepe Myrtles generally offer us at least 100 days of flowers each year.

Are these plants you can grow in your garden?  Do you share our August  ‘Bright, white Christmas’ ?

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August 2, 2016 entrance 005

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Woodland Gnome 2016

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Lagerstroemia indica 'Natchez' grows to 30' high in our area. These beautiful Crepe Myrtle trees naturalize and grow with little assistance or cultivation. I prefer to prune and shape our trees in late winter to direct their strong growth and promote abundant summer flowers.

Lagerstroemia indica ‘Natchez’ grows to 30′ high in our area. These beautiful Crepe Myrtle trees naturalize and grow with little assistance or cultivation.  I prefer to prune and shape our trees in late winter to direct their strong growth and promote abundant summer flowers.  Their peeling bark and sculptural form looks beautiful in the landscape through the winter.  Leaves turn bright orange-red in autumn.

 

 

Leaf Studies

1,

1.

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Cathy, of Rambling in the Garden, inspired me with her July post  for ‘Garden Blogger’s Foliage Day’, hosted by Christina of My Hesperides Garden on the 22nd of each month.

Cathy constructed a tessellation of 16 square photos featuring the textures and varying shades of green, showcasing leaves from her summer garden.  Her post is stunning, and perhaps you will take a moment to pop over and have a look at her photos.

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2.

2.

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Foliage can be so much better than flowers.  Leaves last for weeks or even months; not just days.  They are tough.  And the intricate details of their structure, often highlighted in vivid color, elevate these organs of photosynthesis to art in its purest form.

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3.

3.

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There was finally an opportunity to focus on foliage this morning while I watered the garden.  We have record heat here in Virginia this week, making it more critical to venture out early in the day, or just before dusk, to hydrate pots and new plantings.  Our afternoon heat indexes near 120F,  yet these beautiful leaves endure mid-summer temperatures gracefully.

Water droplets on the leaves make them even more interesting to photograph.

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4.

4.

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I have enjoyed taking and editing these photos because they showcase some of my favorite leaves in a unique way.  Following Cathy’s example, I’ve cropped each into a square.  Within that square, there is an effort to show you several different features of each plant’s particular foliage.

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6.

5.

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To make it even more interesting, I challenge you to guess the names of as many leaves as you might recognize.  Answers will appear below.

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Collecting and growing beautiful plants remains my passion. I’m attracted by the unique shapes, colors, patterns and textures of their foliage.  Any flowers are surely a bonus, but almost distract from the beauty of these special leaves.

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18.

18.

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Grown more for their beauty than for any other purpose, they fill the garden with excitement.  Some are scented; others not.  Most of these are tropical, though a few hardy ones can survive our winters.  Each unfolds its unique geometry, a study in beauty and endurance.

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19.

19.

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Photos by Woodland Gnome 2016
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20.

20.

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“Plants cannot stay safe.
Desire for light spools grass out of the ground;
desire for a visitor spools red ruffles out of twigs.
Desire makes plants very brave,
so they can find what they desire;
and very tender, so they can feel what they find.”
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Amy Leach
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Caladium

Caladium

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  1. Caladium ‘White Christmas’
  2. Begonia ‘Gryphon’
  3. Coleus ‘Wizard Pineapple’
  4. Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Mariesii’
  5. Begonia Rex
  6. Colocasia ‘Mojito’
  7. Fig
  8. Sarracenia flava
  9. Alocasia
  10. Caladium ‘White Queen’
  11. Oxalis ‘Iron Cross’
  12. Pelargonium ‘Vancouver Centennial’
  13. Pineapple Mint
  14. Coleus
  15. Pelargonium – Rose scented geranium
  16. Angel wing Begonia
  17. Canna ‘Australia’
  18. hardy Begonia ‘grandis’
  19. Pelargonium ‘Grey Lady Plymouth’
  20. Dryopteris erythrosora ‘Brilliance’

Wish Granted: Caladium ‘Desert Sunset’

Caladium 'Desert Sunset' develped by Dr. Robert Hartman of Classic Caladiums LLC.

Caladium ‘Desert Sunset’ developed by Dr. Robert Hartman of Classic Caladiums LLC.

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Caladium ‘Desert Sunset’ has to be one of the more beautiful and unusual Caladiums I’ve encountered.  Introduced to the trade in 2015, this elegant Caladium was developed by Dr. Robert Hartman, CEO of Classic Caladiums in Avon Park Florida.  Dr. Hartman is a graduate of the University of Florida, which has been active in hybridizing sun tolerant and disease resistant Caladiums for Florida growers over the last several decades.

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July 23, 2016 Caladiums DS 002

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I learned about Dr. Hartman’s work and his recent Caladium introductions after Don Patterson, of Classic Caladiums, left a comment on my post “Summer Love:  Caladiums,” earlier this month.  When Mr. Patterson suggested he might send me some Caladiums to trial in Virginia, I immediately visited their site to see Classic Caladiums’ recent  introductions.

That is how I discovered this 2015 introduction, C. ‘Desert Sunset.’  I am intrigued both by this unusual color pattern, unique as far as I’m aware in Caladiums, but also the beautiful leaf form.  When I didn’t hear back from Mr. Patterson, I looked into ordering a few of the tubers to enjoy for the rest of this season.  The smallest package, with postage, runs around $40.  Needless to say, I was still considering whether to make the investment this year or wait to order next spring.

But to my utter delight, I spotted the now familiar leaf of C. ‘Desert Sunset’ at our local Lowes store last week!  Monrovia is offering the cultivar this year!

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July 22, 2016 sunset 017

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I was utterly amazed to find these beautiful plants already available at our local ‘big box’ nursery, and bought a few pots on the spot.  That gave me four plants for less than half of what I would have invested in 10 tubers, and the plants are already in full leaf; no waiting for them to sprout.

I’ve potted all of the plants together in an 18′ plastic dish and set them in partial sun under the shade of a Crepe Myrtle, but near enough to the driveway that this area remains hot.  I’ve also started a few Dichondra cuttings as ground cover below the Caladiums.  These photos were taken within the first 48 hours of potting up, but on a few different occasions to show the leaves in differing light.

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July 22, 2016 sunset 018

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These leaves are variable depending on the relative intensity of the light.  They absolutely sparkle.  And, the leaves change as they grow and mature.  There is a wide variation of shading between different leaves on the same plant.  This cultivar is definitely a cut above the traditional Caladiums available since the 1940s and 1950s.

Natives of Mexico, Central and South America; Caladiums were first collected in the late 18th Century and have been grown commercially and hybridized in this country since around 1910. Although popular in Europe, Caladiums were introduced to the American public in 1893 at the Chicago World’s Fair.

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C. 'White Queen' and other varieties we are already growing back lit at sunset earlier this week.

C. ‘White Queen’ and other varieties we are already growing back lit, shortly before sunset, earlier this week.

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In the early years of the 20th century, Henry Nehrling and Theodore Mead began breeding Caladiums in Florida. They had nearly 2000 different hybrids, a few of which are still available commercially today.  But Caladium breeding ended for a while when their efforts stopped, until Frank Joyner (C. ‘Postman Joyner’ is named for him) began actively breeding new cultivars at his home in the 1950s.

The University of Florida program began in 1976 and remains the only institutional Caladium breeding program in the world today.  Dr. Hartman and his company, Classic Caladiums, continue the tradition of improving older Caladium varieties and developing improved ones.  Cultivars with “Florida” in their name were developed by the University of Florida and most are quite tolerant  of at least partial sun.  These cultivars are sought out for superior growth and leaf color, tolerance to cold and productivity.

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Caladium 'Moonlight' is an older white variety which prefers full shade.

Caladium ‘Florida Moonlight’ is an older white variety which prefers partial to full shade.  This is among the whitest and most luminescent Caladiums available.

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You will find a few other absolutely unique and interesting Caladiums offered through Classic Caladiums such as C. ‘Mt. Everest,’ a lance leafed white variety which will tolerate full sun; C. ‘Peppermint;’ and the huge C. ‘Sweet Carolina,’ which reaches 36″ or more and can take full sun.

Any Caladium is beautiful and infinitely useful in the garden.  There are varieties I’ve loved and planted for years, like C. ‘White Queen’ and C. ‘Miss Muffet.’  Now that I’ve learned about these wonderful new introductions my spring choices will be made even more difficult.  So little space, so many beautiful plants….

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C. 'Desert Sunset' in different light shows some leaves to be almost white.

C. ‘Desert Sunset’ in different light shows some leaves to be almost white.

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But I will always find space for beauties like C. ‘Desert Sunset.’  This takes the color palette off on a marvelous tangent towards more salmon and copper.  I am looking forward to experimenting with interesting pairings and uses for this special Caladium as it grows through the rest of the season.

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Woodland Gnome 2016

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July 23, 2016 Caladiums DS 003

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Summer Love: Caladiums

'Florida Sweetheart' Caladium growing in a basket with Begonia 'Richmondensis' offers the perfect summer Valentine.

‘Florida Sweetheart’ Caladium growing in a basket with Begonia ‘Richmondensis’ offers the perfect summer Valentine.

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I love the bright, bold Caladium leaves of summer.  These huge tropical beauties, often called ‘elephant ears’ for both their size and their shape, remind me of living Valentines.   Their form, their red and pink coloring, and their wild patterns remind me of February’s little expressions of love, grown huge summer’s muggy heat.

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C. 'Gypsy Rose' was among the first Caladiums we planted out in early May.

C. ‘Gypsy Rose’ was among the first Caladiums we planted out in May.

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Ours got a late start this year.  It was too cold to put them outside until well into May.  Caladiums love heat!

Plant them out too early and they will sulk along, and maybe even rot before rooting and sending up their beautiful leaves.  Growers counsel us to wait until it is 65F outside at night, consistently, before planting them in the ground.

That is why I start them indoors, in potting soil, and have them ready to go outside when the weather has warmed enough to grow them.

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These 'Florida' series Caladiums, developed at the University of Florida, can take more sun than many other varieties will tolerate.

These ‘Florida’ series Caladiums, developed at the University of Florida, can take more sun than many other varieties will tolerate.

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I planted out the last of our sprouted tubers just last week, believe it or not!  These last were some of the tiniest tubers which came with our order, and they were planted in a plastic box, waiting in the garage for me to decide where they were to go.  (Sometimes small pieces break off of larger tubers during shipping.  Though they are small, they will still root and grow!)

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These are the last stragglers of this season, planted out about a week ago. Their tubers are the size of grapes, but I expect them to fill out in the coming weeks.

These are the last stragglers of this season, planted out about a week ago. Their tubers are only the size of grapes, but I expect them to fill out in the coming weeks.  The largest is C. ‘Florida Red Ruffle.’

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These were the last to finally grow leaves.  I planted them in the shade of some shrubs, where we’ve not had Caladiums in years past.  They are near the top of our drive, planted in a shallow layer of compost, where we can see and enjoy them every time we come and go.  With this new bed started, I’ll begin adding companions after the Caladiums establish, to fill it out.

The Caladiums I ordered last February, from a grower in Florida, arrived huge and healthy.  I was amazed to unpack them and discover a few  Caladium tubers the size of baking potatoes!

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C. 'Florida Fantasy' remains one of my all-time favorite Caladiums. They are surprisingly sun tolerant to have such a delicate, white leaf. This one grows in full shade.

C. ‘Florida Fantasy’ remains one of my all-time favorite Caladiums. They are surprisingly sun tolerant to have such a delicate, white leaf. This one grows in full shade.

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But some from a ‘starter pack’ we also ordered from the grower, weren’t that large at all; maybe the size of a large grape.  Not to worry.  The tuber size doesn’t affect the leaf size or height.  This is a genetic thing.  The tuber size determines how many leaves will grow from the one plant.  And of course, the tuber expands over the course of the season.

I also picked up a pack of C. ‘Florida Moonlight’ tubers at the ‘end of season’ sale from a local nursery.

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C. 'Florida Moonlight' grows here with hardy Begonia.

C. ‘Florida Moonlight’ grows here with hardy Begonia grandis.

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These were about the size of a half dollar, and it was warm enough to plant them directly outside.  After nearly a month in the ground, they are just beginning to send up leaves now.  I have high hopes that they will fill out and look stunning by August.

The earliest tubers to go out, in May, all survived, despite our cool nights lasting well into early summer. After a slow start,  they are responding to our heat and making lots of new leaves.  Watching each huge new leaf unroll brings its own pleasure!  Our hot, humid summers offer the tropical climate these lovely beauties crave.

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This is a single plant from one of those 'baked potato' sized tubers. The photo was taken after 6 this evening, and you can see how bright the sun remained even late in the afternoon.

This Caladium  is a single plant from one of those ‘baked potato’ sized tubers. The photo was taken after 6 this evening, and you can see how bright the sun remained even late in the day.

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Grown in dappled shade, Caladiums never scorch or wilt.  Deer and rabbits rarely touch them, as their leaves are mildly poisonous to eat.  Their color is as bright as any flower, and far more long lasting and reliable.  They beautifully fill a pot or bed.

They are neat and require very little care, beyond keeping them watered when there is a break in the summer rain.  Caladiums are raised on sandy soils in Florida, but they appreciate compost in their soil, and a little feeding to keep them going strong.

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Here is the same plant, photographed a few hours later.

Here is the same plant, photographed a few hours later.  I love these wildly patterned leaves of C. ‘Lance Wharton’!

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New Caladium varieties are introduced each year.  Some of the newer ones are the “Florida” series, bred at the University of Florida after 1988, to give better leaf production, larger tubers and to tolerate more direct sun.  Look for those Caladiums with ‘Florida’ in their name, such as C. Florida Red Ruffles and C. Florida Fantasy if you want an improved, relatively sun tolerant Caladium plant.

Dr. Robert Hartman, CEO of Classic Caladiums in Zolfo Springs and Avon Park, FL; is introducing several exciting new, improved Caladium varieties each year.  Most of these new varieties can tolerate full sun with proper hydration.  I am looking forward to growing a few of these varieties in the coming months, and will post photos as they grow.  One in particular, a 2016 introduction called C. ‘Desert Sunset’ has piqued my interest for its beautiful salmon and copper coloring and ruffled form.

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July 7, 2016 Evening garden 013

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I like to mix Caladiums with ferns and Begonias.  I tend to use them as an accent plant in a pot or bed.  Others may prefer to grow a solid bed of Caladiums for a massed effect.  Use low ferns, Ajuga, Oxalis, Vinca, or other low ground cover plants to fill in the bed.  You can select Caladium varieties by size, with heights between just a few inches and several feet.  As with most plants, they tend to grow taller in the shade, and more compact in the sun.

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July 7, 2016 Evening garden 014

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Two other plants, often confused with Caladiums, are also called ‘elephant ears.’  Also tropical, Colocasia and Alocasia have similar leaf shapes, but different coloration and texture. All three of these bloom, but those blooms are insignificant.  Many gardeners simply cut them away.  ‘Elephant ears’ are all grown for their beautiful leaves.

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Alocosia have a thicker, waxier leaf than Caladium. Often, their leaf tips point up towards the sky.

Alocosia have a thicker, waxier leaf than Caladium. Often, their leaf tips point up towards the sky.

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All ‘elephant ears’ love warmth, and nearly all must be brought inside before frost.  They may be dug up and the tubers stored, or they may be kept in pots indoors through the winter.  But only a few cultivars of Colocasia are hardy in our Zone 7.

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Colocasia generally have the largest of the 'elephant ear' leaves. This is C. 'Pink China,' and has proven hardy in our Zone 7 garden. This prolific plant spreads each season and may be easily transplanted.

Colocasia generally have the largest of the ‘elephant ear’ leaves. This is C. ‘Pink China,’ and has proven hardy in our Zone 7 garden.  C. ‘Mojito,’ behind, is supposed to be hardy here, but overwintered in our basement.  These prolific plants spread each season and may be easily transplanted.

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These gorgeous tropical plants, with their heart shaped leaves, are one of my true loves of summer.

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C. 'White Queen'

C. ‘White Queen’

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Big, bold, surprisingly beautiful; elephant ears fill the garden with mass, texture, and movement as they swish and sway in the breeze.  Carefree and attractive, rely on them to look great during the heat of summer.

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July 7, 2016 Caladiums 011

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Woodland Gnome 2016
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July 7, 2016 Evening garden 011

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In A Vase On Monday

February 16, 2015 Monday Vase 002

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Today’s vase of flowers reflects what is growing and blooming in our garden indoors.

We were thrilled to see the Impatiens, tucked into a pot of Caladium tubers back in November, in bloom this weekend.  These are the first Impatiens flowers we’ve seen since autumn.   We expect these cuttings will root and grow on through the coming summer.

The Caladiums have also decided to offer some fresh winter leaves.  I selected two tiny ones for this vase.  A few Cyclamen flowers and a Jewel Orchid stem complete the arrangement.

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February 16, 2015 Monday Vase 003

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We are happy to enjoy a vase of these bright summer flowers, knowing that at least a few of these stems will grow roots and live on. Our indoor garden offers enough flowers to get us through until the garden outside wakes up to spring.

Today’s vase was purchased from the potter at a show a few years ago.  It is very ‘handmade,’ and eccentric, but we admired its free form exuberance and bright glaze.  Sadly, it is signed only with an initial, and I don’t recall the artist’s name.

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February 16, 2015 Monday Vase 005~

The glass ball off to the side is by Portland, Oregon glass artist Paris Birdwell.   I met her at a show  in Oregon last September, and had to bring this unusual piece home.

You can see our stark winter garden through the window.  The hazel tree is absolutely covered with little catkins dancing around in the breeze.

It just looks cold, doesn’t it? 

Our garden is frozen rock solid now, after a winter storm front swept through Saturday evening, leaving Arctic air in its wake.  Our high today was around 20 F, and all of the waterways around us are freezing.  The Violas I had hoped to cut for the vase today have collapsed in the cold, and snow will cover them by nightfall.  They are hardy, though, and can perhaps  be cut next week, instead.

Today we are content to stay inside, where it’s warm enough for flowers, cats and people to grow on happily, and in comfort.

Please visit Cathy, at Rambling In the Garden, to see the beautiful vase of early spring flowers she brought in from her garden today.  Cathy hosts this Monday Vase challenge each week, and you’ll find links in her comments to vases arranged by many other enthusiastic gardeners.

This is an international challenge, and I always find it interesting to see how the seasons are progressing, elsewhere.  If you’re feeling even a little inspired, please pull together a little vase of your own with whatever you can scavenge locally.  Wonderful surprises wait for you to notice them…..

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February 16, 2015 snow 002

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Woodland Gnome 2015

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