Fabulous Friday: Awakening

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On our days off, when there’s no appointment to make or task to complete, it’s a pleasure to awaken slowly and gently.  With no urgency to stay on schedule, no insistent alarm, no pet or child in need of immediate attention, we can relax a bit more and gather our thoughts before starting the day’s routines.

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Cercis chinensis, Chinese redbud, blooming this week at the Williamsburg Botanical Garden.

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This springtime feels like it is awakening slowly, without haste or urgency.  Cool temperatures have slowed down the natural progression of spring’s business this year.  Each blossom and bud is relaxing and taking its time to open, and once open, lasting a few more days than more warmth would allow.

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College Creek

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We’ve had yet another day of cool, soaking rain in our region.  Its rained steadily enough to keep me indoors and it has remained cool enough to slow down the buds on our dogwood trees.  They are still just uncurling, tentatively, and remain more green than white.

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A day like today encourages the fine art of procrastination.  There are a half dozen good reasons to delay most of the tasks on my ‘to-do’ list, especially those tasks that involve waking up more seeds, or tubers, or waking up more beds and borders by removing their blankets of leafy mulch.

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I’ve already delayed many spring time tasks, out of respect for cold nights, cool days and abundant rain.  It’s unwise to work in the soil when it remains so wet.  It’s even unwise to walk around too much on soggy ground, knowing that every step compacts it.

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Dogwood

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But there is balance, over the long view, and I suspect that warmer days are upon us soon.  I saw one of our lizards skitter under a pot when I opened the kitchen door unexpectedly yesterday, and the yard has filled with song birds.  We hear frogs singing now on warm evenings and bees come out whenever it warms in the afternoon sunlight.

They know its time to awaken for another year, and are doing their best to get on with life despite the weather.

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N. ‘Tahiti’

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It is good to rest when one can, storing up energy to spring into action when the time is ripe.  The garage is filled with plants needing to get back outside into the light, to cover themselves with fresh leaves and get on with their growth.  And I need their space for sprouting Caladiums and the small plants and tubers I plan to pick up in Gloucester next week from the Heaths.

There are Zantedeschias in the basement bravely reaching out their fresh leaves towards the windows, and I’m ready to divide and pot up our stored Colocasias and let them get a jump on summer.

And then there is the small matter of packs of seed whose time has come to awaken and grow…

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N. ‘Katie Heath’

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All these plants are waiting for their wake-up call.  I hope the relaxed and gentle start of their new season means they will bring renewed energy and enthusiasm to their growth when the weather is finally settled and warm.

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Japanese painted ferns re-appeared this week, and I have been weeding out early spring weeds wanting to compete with them.

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Until then, I’m enjoying watching the slow progress of spring.

There is time to savor the opening buds, emerging perennials, and slowly expanding vines as they stake their claims for the season.  There is time to relax and gather our thoughts.

There is time to listen to the chattering birds, and to appreciate the sweet gift of unscheduled time.

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Woodland Gnome 2019

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Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Alice’ wakes up for its first season in our garden.

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“Why had he assumed time was some sort of infinite resource?

Now the hourglass had busted open,

and what he’d always assumed was just a bunch of sand

turned out to be a million tiny diamonds.”
.

Tommy Wallach

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“There is no Space or Time
Only intensity,
And tame things
Have no immensity”
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Mina Loy

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Fabulous Friday:  Happiness is Contagious; 

Let’s Infect One Another!

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About woodlandgnome

Lifelong teacher and gardener.

4 responses to “Fabulous Friday: Awakening

  1. That Cercis chinensis looks surprisingly similar to our native Cercis occidentalis, Western redbud. The color is right. Other redbuds are not so flashy bright pink. Sadly, the Western redbud doe not last as long as Eastern redbud or other redbuds.

  2. Good reminder about not walking on soggy ground – don’t want to compact it-
    Also – like that N Katie daffodil photo – and all in the post
    Like how you combined thoughts of the delayed blooms and then relaxing and storing energy-
    This applies to some other areas too –
    Like deepak chopra reminds us that exercise can be overdone and he said sometimes when we workout we think of our energy levels and give “50” effort so we have some for later –
    It is freeing

    • Here is an interesting synchronicity, Yvette- I started reading a new Chopra book this afternoon about- synchronicities and the zero point field. And now you mention Chopra in your comment ❤ His is generally very good advice. Glad you like the Katie Heaths. Do you grow those? I am astounded at how quickly they multiply and what a fabulous stand they've made in just a few years. Thank you, always, for the kind words. I hope you are well and enjoying another beautiful Richmond spring.<3 ❤ ❤

      • Hi – I only grow one daffodil and not sure what it is = and it is leftover from 2004 – can you believe it?
        It was the year I put in mums, daffodils, and tulips – the tulips were gone in one year (neighbor things the bulbs were eaten) –
        but they are the smaller variety – not the large and deep yellow of the KH

        I need to read more Chopra – hope your reading goes great

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