Vine Covered Trees

January 2, 2018 ice and sun 051

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Vine Covered Trees was one of my first posts to Forest Garden in the summer of 2013. It is one of the most viewed pages every month, still.  This post has been viewed about 18,000 times, to date.  I am glad that it has helped people curious about the vines they find growing along the roadsides.

Winter is a great time to work with the vines growing in our garden. We can see the stems of deciduous vines and prune as needed, or pull them out of the trees where they are growing through the canopy. That is on my own ‘to do’ list this month, as a matter of fact!

I’ve just updated this post and added a few new photos. I hope you will find it interesting and useful, especially if you garden in our part of the country where vines are rampant and sometimes predatory….
-WG

Forest Garden

April 19, 2014 wisteria 041 

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In coastal Virginia we’re into our fourth month of hot, muggy, wet weather this summer, and the plants are thick and lush.  Vining plants are scrambling over every support they can reach, turning shrubs and trees in their path to weird, living sculptures.

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Grape vines scramble over these trees along the Colonial Parkway.Grape vines scramble over these trees along the Colonial Parkway.

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We have nine main perennial vines growing wild along the roadsides and in the edges of our gardens, and one annual vine.  

All are beautiful, some are useful, and a few are edible.  Birds enjoy berries produced by these vines, and so spread the seeds.  They crop up, as if by magic, in unusual places.  When you find them in your garden you need to decide whether the vine is a gift you wish to keep or a weed to eradicate.  Some of these vines, like wisteria, honeysuckle, and trumpet vine, are…

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About woodlandgnome

Lifelong teacher and gardener.

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