Blossom XXXIII: October Blues

Can you help me identify this perennial? It is lovely, and I don’t know its name.

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Blue-violet lends a snazzy counter weight to the warm yellows, oranges and reds of our October garden.  Blue flowers and foliage shine and draw my eye with their cool elegance.

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Mexican sage, Salvia Leucantha

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After weeks of Indian summer, cool colors help us forget how hot and muggy the garden still feels many afternoons.  They promise that  cooler weather will soon blow our way.

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Agastache

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Blue-violet flowers also promise a good meal of nectar to the pollinators still buzzing about the garden.

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Salvias and Agastaches produce abundant nectar over a very long season.  Their generous natures support many creatures as the days grow shorter and nights grow cool.

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Woodland Gnome 2017

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Blossom XXXII: Apple Scented Pelargonium

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About woodlandgnome

Lifelong teacher and gardener.

7 responses to “Blossom XXXIII: October Blues

  1. Salvias should be a staple in all gardens. The generous variety of pollinators they attract is a good excuse to simply pull up a stool and watch!!

    • Absolutely! And their colors are so intense! Salvias are easy to grow so long as you have the sunlight to support them, and they feed so many. We had a tremendous storm blow through here in Sunday night, with heavy rain followed by wind much of the night. Yesterday morning I was puzzled to notice my Mexican sage just looking odd… it grows in a pot elevated more than 4″ off the ground, and yet most of the plant had gone missing…… I eventually found the top half of the plant lying on the ground some feet away. Apparently, the wind must have been strong enough to break the main stem of the plant and send the top flying! I’ve never seen a potted plant damaged this way before, but the beautiful (now empty) seedhead of our Aralia spinosa was blown out of its tree in the same way. So we now have a beautiful vase full of Mexican sage, in full bloom, to enjoy indoors. Sadly, the remaining pollinators lost this wonderful spot to feed in the front garden ❤

  2. Laurin Lindsey

    Stunning blues! I love autumn flowers : )

  3. My guess is it’s Prairie gentian (Gentiana puberulenta).

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