WPC: Beneath Our Feet

Variegated ivy scampers onto the porch.

Variegated ivy scampers onto the porch.

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Perhaps it remains a quirk of personality whether one tends to look up towards the sky, down towards one’s feet, or out towards what is happening around us.  I believe the habit is ingrained from childhood; perhaps from what our parents most often admonish us to do.

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A scented Pelargonium growth in a bed cloaked in Vinca and Creeping Jenny.

A rose scented Pelargonium grows in a bed cloaked in Vinca and Creeping Jenny.

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Looking up, we watch large birds of prey circling  overhead.  We keep an eye on the weather, search for the moon, scan the sky for bats and dragonflies at dusk.

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Tadpoles and other tiny creatures can be found in the bog garden.

Tadpoles and other tiny creatures can be found in the bog garden.

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But looking down becomes the habit for gardeners, I believe.  We notice what is growing beneath our feet, and what needs doing with it.

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A new border of Oxalis and Sedum grow along the edges of this once neglected concrete pool, left by the original owners.

A new border of Oxalis and Sedum grow along the edges of this once neglected concrete pool, left by the original owners.

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Any moment of close inspection reveals some rogue something which should be pulled, plucked, or pruned.

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A new hybrid from Plant Delights nursery, this little division of Athyrium niponicum 'Joy Ride'

A new hybrid from Plant Delights nursery, this little division of Athyrium niponicum ‘Joy Ride’ is just getting established in the fern garden.  Gravel on the soil helps hold it in place when it rains.

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Here, we keep an eye out for roots across paths and where the ground suddenly drops off.  Very little of this garden is level, so one is constantly up and down between here and there.

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August 7, 2015 ground 012~

That, and the fact of hoses left uncoiled and pots edging the walkway makes one always vigilant about taking the next step.

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August 2, 2015 garden 053~

But more than that, ground serves as canvas for the four dimensional work we nurture day to day.

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August 7, 2015 ground 011~

The soil matters.  Whether mulched, bare, or growing; we take a keen interest in the garden’s foundation.

And we nearly always find beauty there, beneath our feet.

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A tender Cretan Brake Fern grows from a low pot set in a shady border beneath shrubs.

A tender Cretan Brake Fern grows from a low pot set in a shady border beneath shrubs.

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Inspired by The Daily Post’s

Weekly Photo Challenge: Beneath Your Feet

Woodland Gnome 2015

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August 7, 2015 ground 024

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About woodlandgnome

Lifelong teacher and gardener.

8 responses to “WPC: Beneath Our Feet

  1. Love the plants beneath your feet – thanks so much for sharing !!!

  2. Oh – that Vinca/CJ combination is lovely! And I’m so intrigued by your bog garden. I think if I had one, I would spend a lot of time gazing at the creatures in it. Fascinating, for sure! 🙂

    • Thank you, Anna. The Vinca is planted entirely by nature, and the CJ spreads where it will, as you know. I enjoy the contrast of these two vines growing in harmony and so leave them to grow in peace as much as possible 😉 I’ve wanted to construct this bog garden for several years now. I spend time there most days watching for tadpoles and replenishing the water when needed. My partner sometimes spots frogs hiding in the pools. Birds love it, and surely there are visitors who wait until we’re back indoors to enjoy it, too. Thank you for visiting today, ❤ ❤ ❤ WG

  3. Look up, look down, look all around. Those are the instructions I hear in my head, but also “watch your step” (which can be taken different ways, according to context). The gophers have rendered our land unnavigable unless we watch our steps.

    • And that is the truth of it here, too; except its voles for us, Rickii. We spend quite a bit of time stomping down those tunnels 😉 I hope you find as much time for looking up, as for looking down 😉 Giant hugs, WG

  4. Great pics – lovely stuff under your feet! The creeping Jenny and the vinca look great together and I love the Cretan fern, so pretty. Is the oxalis hardy or do you have to bring it inside in the fall?

    • Thank you, Eliza 😉 The Oxalis is supposed to be hardy here. Of course, it is supposed to be deer resistant, too. It has been routinely de-frocked. I’ll probably dig a few to bring in, and leave the rest to the elements to see what happens 😉 Giant hugs, WG ❤ ❤ ❤

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