Garden Blogger’s Foliage Day: June

This little Acer Plamatum germinated in my parents' garden this spring.  I brought it home to grow on, here in a large pot with ferns and Caladiums.

This little Acer Palmatum germinated in my parents’ garden this spring. I brought it home to grow on, here in a large pot with ferns and Caladiums.

~

Our world is leafy green this month; a thousand shades of green.  Yet there are many more colors found glowing on leaves in our garden.

~

Coleus

Coleus

~

Layer upon layer of leaves extend themselves to catch the sun’s rays.

~

Canna lilies have reached about half their final height.  Hibiscus, behind them, will bloom with scarlet flowers in a few weeks.

Canna lilies have reached about half their final height. Hibiscus, behind them, will bloom with scarlet flowers in a few weeks.

~

From the Oaks’ canopies down to the tiny chartreuse leaves of creeping Jenny, Lysimachia nummularia, which blanket parts of our garden; leaves bask in summer’s brilliant sunshine.

~

June 20, 2015 garden 001

~

I ventured into new territory last summer when planting a border of tall Canna lilies, given by a friend, and elephant ear Colocasia.  Both are well up now with the Cannas bursting into bloom.

~

June 16, 2015 blooming in June 022

~

They will continue growing for a few weeks, topping out above head high with blooms through the summer.

~

June 16, 2015 blooming in June 017~

Tall, perennial Hibiscus join these tropical looking, large plants in the front border.  I’ve extended the grouping to a new area in the lower garden where growth has been slow.

~

Colocasia 'Mojito'

Colocasia ‘Mojito’

~

There is less light here, and the Cannas were purchased as roots just this spring.  I hope they will catch up in the summer heat and make a good show by mid-summer.

~

June 20, 2015 garden 012~

They border the new bog garden, filled now with pitcher plants, Sarraceniaceae, which are native to the mid-Atlantic coast; with the African rose Hibiscus; Colocasia esculenta ‘Mojito’ and Coleus.  Two pots of milkweed grow here, too, in our hope to draw in Monarch butterflies.

~

Oxalis triangularis has struggled here because deer frequently graze these beautiful burgundy leaves.

Oxalis triangularis has struggled here because deer frequently graze these beautiful burgundy leaves.

~

The border of Oxalis I planted with such confidence in May is nearly gone, grazed by rogue deer who have somehow snuck into the garden through our fences.  I’ve sprayed what remains with deer repellent and hope they will re-grow from the tubers.

~

This Oxalis has been protected with a clove of garlic grown here since fall.  In more shade, there are no flowers and darker leaves.  A division of hardy Begonia can be seen at the top of the photo, and a division of fern to the far right.  These will fill in fairly quickly.

This Oxalis has been protected with a clove of garlic grown here since fall.  In more shade, there are no flowers and darker leaves. A division of hardy Begonia can be seen at the top of the photo, and a division of fern to the far right. These will fill in fairly quickly.

~

Oxalis is supposed to be ‘deer resistant,’ but anyone who gardens near deer understands the humor of that phrase.

~

Voodoo lily and a division of Colocasia 'China Pink' grow in front of our Edgeworthia in part shade.

Voodoo lily and a division of Colocasia ‘China Pink’ grow in front of our Edgeworthia in part shade.  Rudbeckia, to the right, will bloom golden in July.  I just love these spotted stems!

~

Our collection of poisonous plants has grown this summer to include the “Voodoo Lily,” Sauromatum venosum, bought at Brent and Becky’s Bulbs in April; and a hardy Calla lily, just ordered from Plant Delights Nursery near Raleigh, NC.

~

June 14, 2015 calla lily 2 004~

I was pleased to learn that Calla, native to South Africa, is in fact poisonous.  The poisonous leaves have more staying power in our garden, and do no harm to those who aren’t grazing them!

~

Helebores, also poisonous, protects this pot from grazing.  The Heuchera would be munched if unprotected.

Hellebore, also poisonous, protects this pot from grazing. The Heuchera would be munched if unprotected.

~

There are many more leaves to share, but you’ll see them as the summer unfolds.

~

June 22, 2015 foliage 012~

We continue to plant ferns, and we’ve added several new cultivars this year.

~

June 22, 2015 foliage 002

~

We have also found several interesting cultivars of scented Pelargonium.  This rose scented Pelargonium grows in a pot with Ajuga.

~

June 22, 2015 foliage 007~

Herbs smell wonderful on hot sunny days, and have such beautiful foliage.

~

June 18, 2015 bees 002

~

 I appreciate Christina, who gardens in the Hesperides,  for hosting this Garden Blogger’s Foliage Day meme on the 22nd of each month. She challenges us to focus on the foliage in our gardens; not just the flowers.

Please visit her and follow as many links as you can to enjoy beautiful foliage posts photographed in a variety of different gardens.

But, before you do, we will end with a few more photos of my beloved Begonias:

~

~

There will be another Begonia post soon.  These beauties continue growing better each week.

~

June 14, 2015 garden 017~

Woodland Gnome 2015

Advertisements

About woodlandgnome

Lifelong teacher and gardener.

12 responses to “Garden Blogger’s Foliage Day: June

  1. Love your begonias! Deer are such a pain in the garden…I noted today that all the rudbeckia I planted at the renovation site were munched clear down to the ground! I thought rudbeckia was resistant – as you said, it is a joke on us!

  2. Leave it to the leaves, I always say, to do the heavy lifting in the garden. You have an exceptional collection.

  3. wow !! what a variety of leafs ! I love colocasia leafs, I used to have one but he struggled in Winter and then died, it is just too cold over here, I overwintered it inside but still he didn’t make it.

    • They are fun to watch growing, Gwennie. Here they just leap from a tiny thing to huge in no time. I”m amazed at their energy. I overwintered 6 little divisions in pots in my basement last winter. They all made it with minimal care. I just kept them near a window and didn’t let them dry out. They struggled, but lived. The Caladiums overwintering in the same space all died, which was a huge disappointment. We just do the best we can season to season and hope for the best. Please try Colocasia again if you get the opportunity. I have kept mine successfully in a pot of moist soil and low light at around 45-60F.

      • I think it went wrong cos I forgot to keep them moist in Winter, now that I stopt working I have more time do do things properly so I will try them again for sure. But this years garden season is low key as I broke my wrist in April and it is still sore so I can’t do much in the garden yet so I hope I can do more gardening next year !!

        • I hope your wrist is healing well and will soon be back to normal . And I hope your garden is giving you a lot of pleasure even though you’re off of your normal routine . We constantly learn new things about plants as time goes on , which makes it always interesting . The first year we grew Colocasia, we kept it in pots and brought it inside with the Begonias, in fall. It grew enough that I could divide it when taking it out in spring . They are marginal here , and we lost those plants the following winter when we didn’t dig them up .

          • My wrist is getting better thank you. But I am still a long way from “normal” as I am not so young anymore…..but I can do more and more every day, I can drive the car again although it hurts ( we don’t have an automatic like most Americans) I went shopping for the first time this afternoon without my husband and >>I enjoyed it soooo much !!

  4. Oxalis, I’ve admired those in other gardens this year but didn’t know what it was called. I love the burgandy/purple foliage.

    • Suzi, these strange leaves always bring me a smile. You can order a bag of them for only a few dollars, too. I just discovered a single leaf will grow roots in water. They make a nice little ground cover in a pot. Now, If I can just get a solid fringe of them to grow, unmolested, around that new little bog garden! Thank you for visiting, WG

We always appreciate your comments. Thank you for adding your insight to the conversation.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 514 other followers

Follow Forest Garden on WordPress.com
Order Classic Caladiums

This Month’s Posts

Topics of Interest

%d bloggers like this: