WPC: Wall of Bald Cypress Roots

March 12, 2015 watershed 054

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Walls are supports as well as barriers.  They add a decorative touch in gardens; a sense of enclosure and privacy.  Walls offer structure to our landscapes as well as to our homes. Walls give us protection from the elements and a sense of  security.

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March 12, 2015 watershed 044

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This week the Daily Post’s  Weekly Photo Challenge asks photographers to share photos of walls which reveal a sense of place; telling us something important about that place.

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The Chickahominy River flows into the James, then on to the Chesapeake Bay.

Knobby roots of the Cypress trees form a wall along the beach, protecting the river’s bank.

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Roots of the Bald Cypress trees growing on the bank of the Chickahominy river form a wall, a barrier, along the beach.  Bald Cypress, Taxodium distichum, one of the hardest of hardwoods, is recognized by its rock-hard knobby roots which grow out in all directions from the tree’s trunk.

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March 12, 2015 watershed 051

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Cypress can be found growing along rivers and in swamps throughout our region.  A deciduous conifer, the Bald Cypress is an ancient tree.  Fossils prove they were growing in this region more than 8 million years ago, and a single tree may live for well over 1000 years.

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March 12, 2015 watershed 058

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The Cypress roots which line this beach also protect it.  They hold the soil and sand in place to control erosion during flooding and storms.

They form a protective barrier for the beach, a living, breathing wall of roots.

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March 12, 2015 watershed 053

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Woodland Gnome 2015

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About woodlandgnome

Lifelong teacher and gardener.

10 responses to “WPC: Wall of Bald Cypress Roots

  1. Pingback: Photo Challenge: Wall | The Bohemian Rock Star's "Untitled Project"

  2. Pingback: Photo Challenge: Wall | The Bohemian Rock Star's "Untitled Project"

  3. Beautiful shots, and wonderful information. The bald cypress is (to me) a fascinating and beautiful tree. I first saw them in the south, but then found out they grow in northeast Ohio (in Zone 5 area). I’d like to plant a few here. I was surprised we don’t have any (given that they grow in the surrounding area).

    • Thank you, Robin. This is a beautiful park on the western edge of the county. Driving over the bridge offers spectacular views. Yes, I would expect you to have Cypress everywhere, as do we. I see them offered from time to time in the catalogs- and of course the Audiobook society offers small ones. So they grow in Ohio? That is a huge range! Thank you for visiting today- best wishes, WG

  4. Great Shot! A lot of life and artistic detail captured. Wow.

  5. I’m enchanted by the idea of having a wall of knobby cypress roots in my garden, but I’m afraid that they take quite a lot of space and our neighbours love their simple iron fence so that we can’t see anything.:)

  6. I find Bald Cypress fascinating with those knobby knees sticking up – it even looks like a species that is 8 million years old. It has lived through eons of drought and flood, adapting to it all.
    Great subject for the challenge, as it provides a protective wall that is an environmentally invaluable.

    • “We speak for the trees…” 😉 Do these grow as far north as Massachusetts? The birds love these guys 😉 Glad I was able to use these photos from yesterday to meet today’s WPC 😉 Best wishes, WG

      • Even though they are hardy to zone 5, I have never seen one around here and associate them with the South. Perhaps the original ones were all cut down by the colonists.
        Have a great weekend!

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