Lavender Lovers

August 19, 2014 lavender 016

 

When Jennifer issued her One Word Photo Challenge: Lavender this morning, I headed out between showers to capture a few photos of our lavender flowers in the garden.

We have been admiring the lavender Rose of Sharon from the living room windows.

 

Rose of Sharon

Rose of Sharon

In fact the hummingbirds have been hovering near them them all morning between the showers, and we enjoy watching them come and go.

But I suspected there might be other lavender flowers blooming this morning, if only I’d go out and notice them.

Chocolate mint in bloom

Chocolate mint in bloom

How does one draw a firm line between what is lavender and what is blue or pink?

There are so many shades, and all shine differently depending on the light.

Salvia nemerosa with Artemesia

Salvia nemerosa with Artemesia

 

Soon I was straying off the patio and into the wet grass, following the trail of lavender flowers through the garden.

August 19, 2014 lavender 011

And despite the wet, overcast weather, the garden was still buzzing with hungry creatures flying from flower to flower.

August 19, 2014 lavender 019

Perhaps moving a bit more slowly today, they seemed not to mind  me closing in with the camera to capture their portraits.

I wonder how these flowers appear to our bees, and to our dragonflies.

Bumblebee on Joe Pye Weed

Bumblebee on Joe Pye Weed

 

Do their compound eyes see these colors even more intensely than ours?

Can they see flowers in ways we can only dream them?

A butterfly shares the Joe Pye Weed blossoms with the bee.

A moth shares the Joe Pye Weed blossoms with the bee.

What must it be like to spend one’s entire lifetime in pursuit of flowers, and the sweet nectar and pollen they hold?  Might bees, like whales and dolphins, have a level of intelligence in advance of our own?

We have learned much about bees, and their language of dance, in recent years.  

Now scientists have learned they can be trained, even more quickly than dogs, to sniff out certain odors.

August 19, 2014 lavender 017

New technologies are in development which use trained bees to sniff out drugs and other substances.  It is all quite amazing to realize that bees can communicate with us in so many ways.

The low hum of their contented buzzing filled our garden this morning, much like the hum of a cat’s purr.

Hearing from friends across the country that bees are scarce in some gardens this summer, we feel special appreciation for the bees who choose to visit ours.

 

August 19, 2014 lavender 001

Another vital link in the web of life which brings food to our own table, we  appreciate the lives of bees;

and all of the other small creatures who spend their lives in pursuit of nectar, moving from flower to flower in the garden.

 

 

Photos by Woodland Gnome 2014

One Word Photo Challenge: Lavender… Forest Garden

More One Word Photo Challenge: Lavender photos

 

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About woodlandgnome

Lifelong teacher and gardener.

14 responses to “Lavender Lovers

  1. Overcast skies are better for capturing blue/lavender so I guess the weather was advantageous for the challenge. I adore your Rose of Sharon photo with the water droplets – great capture. Bees see ultraviolet light and many flowers are like runway beacons for attracting the bees to their nectar/pollen. If you had a black light, you could see what your flowers look like to bees. Bzzzz!

    • Yes, quite a buzz! No wonder they look blissed out much of the time 😉 Thanks for the kind words on the Rose of Sharon photo. I’m thinking of changing my screensaver to the little bee on the Salvia- that is my favorite image of the set 😉

  2. The Rose of Sharon is gorgeous. But of course the rest of your photos and words are perfect as always. Thank you so much for sharing your lavender 🙂

  3. I love the lavender rose of Sharon! I have a rescue plant that’s been uprooted, chopped to bits, and moved to my yard. She’s doing well, and has the loveliest flowers. 😊

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