What’s Blooming Now?

"The Devil's Walking Stick", Aralia spinosa, earns its name because its trunk and branches are covered in large sharp thorns.

“The Devil’s Walking Stick”, Aralia spinosa, earns its name because its trunk and branches are covered in large sharp thorns.  It’s huge heads of flowers seem to crop up in the strangest places, including this one reaching over the fence to bloom in my back garden.

Just as in the springtime we watch the landscape erupt into Forsythia and daffodils; then Magnolias, fruit trees, Dogwoods, Azaleas, and tulips; so the autumn also has its own progression of color and bloom.

The last of the Hibiscus  bloom in this marsh filling up with the seed heads of grasses.

The last of the Hibiscus bloom in this marsh filling up with the seed heads of grasses.

Goldenrod beside the road on Jamestown Island.

Goldenrod beside the road on Jamestown Island.

We have  passed  the midpoint of August, and goldenrod paints the roadsides and empty places golden. August 15 2013 parkway 015

August 11 2013 CP trees 031

Staghorn Sumac has grown its flower heads, like gigantic cream colored tassels.

Staghorn Sumac blooming now, will soon have deep burgundy seed heads.

Staghorn Sumac

In a few more weeks the seed heads will turn rich burgundy, and the leaves will go scarlet.

Sweet Autumn Clematis

Sweet Autumn Clematis

Sweet Autumn Clematis, extending its reach all summer, finally opens its white flowers.

Sweet Autumn Clematis "frosting" the crown of this shrub.

Sweet Autumn Clematis “frosting” the crown of this shrub.

It is like frosting, or a light sprinkling of snow on the still green landscape.

Trumpet vine climbs this pine.

Trumpet vine climbs this pine.

Orange trumpet vine cloaks tree trunks, fences, and telephone wires, calling to every hummingbird in the neighborhood to stop in for a sip of nectar.

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A last pink Hibiscus

The last few Hardy Hibiscus flowers of the season open amid the already ripening seed pods of their earlier blooming sisters.

"The Devil's Walking Stick"

“The Devil’s Walking Stick”

Tall shrubs of “The Devil’s Walking Stick”, Aralia spinosa,  poke out from odd places with their huge crowns of flowers.

Autust 6 colonial Pkwy 015August 15 2013 parkway 017

Stems covered with sharp thorns, this North American Native shines in the autumn as its flowers grow into tiny berries, loved by the birds.

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Hydrangeas are fading to purple and brown.

August 1 2013 rain soaked garden 007

Dogwoods are beginning to show red in their leaves, but their berries won’t turn red for several more weeks.

The Kingspoint dock, on College Creek

The Kingspoint Club dock, on College Creek

August teases us with the first cool nights, the first chilly mornings, inviting us to bring our steaming coffee mug outside to watch the mist lift off the yard.

Bank of the James River, near Jamestown.

Bank of the James River, near Jamestown.

Bold strokes of gold, mahogany, and white  appear to relieve the solid green of summer.

Rudbeckia, Black Eyed Susans, finally open.  Here they are planted with Zinnia, coneflower, and daisy in my garden.

Rudbeckia, Black Eyed Susans, finally open. Here they are planted with Zinnia, coneflower, and daisy in my garden.

Rudbeckia blossoms finally open.

Joe Pye Weed on the bank of College Creek.

Joe Pye Weed on the bank of College Creek.

Pink Joe Pye Weed beckons the butterflies for feasting.

Lycoris, Spider Lilies

Lycoris, Spider Lilies, bloom in late summer.  Their leaves come and go earlier in the season.  The flower stalks appear very quickly, always a happy surprise.

Lycoris flowers appear, as if by magic,

This perennial "weed" is related to Ageratum, and blooms in beautiful periwinkle blue late into Autumn.

This perennial “weed” is related to Ageratum, and blooms in beautiful periwinkle blue late into Autumn.

Weeds bloom and are called wildflowers,

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And this tiny vine unfurls its flowers along the marshy bank of College Creek.

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I don’t know its name, and so far haven’t been able to identify it.  So delicate and lovely, it reminds us that summer days are almost passed.

August 3 2013 more crepe myrtles 023

Fawn grazing on the Colonial Parkway.

Fawn grazing on the Colonial Parkway.

About woodlandgnome

Lifelong teacher and gardener.

5 responses to “What’s Blooming Now?

  1. Pingback: Like A Dusting of Snow: Sweet Autumn Clematis | Forest Garden

  2. Forest So Green

    The leaves on the trees are still green. We do not have any leaves change colors until middle of September.

    • We believe it will be an early autumn. As of today, some dogwood leaves are entirely scarlet, and we have some pure yellow leaves on the tulip poplars. They aren’t waiting for frost. Interesting that they are turning so early here, but not up by the Lakes.

  3. Forest So Green

    It is so much fun to watch the changes in nature.

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